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Rapid Change in a Warming World

Climate change isn’t always slow, small, and imperceptible in a human lifetime. Ice core analysis has found a single decade in which temperatures over Greenland shot up about 15 degrees Celsius.

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The Climate Jump Heard 'Round The World

Scientists know that the unusual and rapid temperature jump of the Younger Dryas was felt over half the globe. But they're only now beginning to understand why.

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Ghosts of Tsunamis Past

By unearthing sediment deposits tsunamis leave behind, scientists can study the waves' origins, extent, and frequency — and identify locations that have the geological apparatus to produce a tsunami, but haven't in written history.

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From Math to Maps

A tsunami hasn't affected the Pacific Northwest coast since 1964, yet bright-blue metal signs warning of them dot coastal streets. Find out why scientists are certain these communities are at risk.

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Fear the Future Tsunami?

Why did Hawaiian officials evacuate Hilo Bay in 1986 after a 7.7 earthquake but call off an evacuation in 2003 after a 7.8 one? The answer is DART. Learn more.

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Article: Yellowstone National Park is a Volcano

More than three million visitors step onto this charged volcanic landscape every year. Yet the geologists that monitor it are unconcerned about a large, imminent eruption. Find out why.

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Article: Signs of Restlessness

The magma chamber responsible for Yellowstone's volcanic activity is buried 8km beneath the surface. Find out how researchers monitor its geologic moves.

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Article: Zircons Recast Earth's Earliest Era

Rocks older than 4 billion years are not available to study, making the first 500 million years of Earth's history particularly mysterious. But cutting-edge techniques are now allowing geologists to study survivors of Earth's early era.

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Welcome to the Subfamily

Meet "Big Red," a new species of jellyfish that is bulbous, dusky red, and huge, nearly one meter (about three feet) in diameter, with several fleshy arms instead of tentacles, like a balloon with greedy fingers.

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