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YNA 2000 WInners Hero

"Looking Back, Looking Ahead"

2000 Winning Essays

Eleven winning essays from the 2000 contest year of the Young Naturalist Awards by students from grade 7 - 12. "Looking Back, Looking Ahead" was the focus of this year's awards as students documented some of the great achievements science has made during the last century.

cloning

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Seeing Double: An Exhibit on Cloning

Cloning was once considered scientifically impossible. And then came Dolly, the sheep that made headlines around the world. Tour the science of cloning with this 11th-grader from New Jersey.

Mars-Past-Present-Future

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Mars: Past, Present, Future

In the early 1900s, some astronomers believed that the color contrasts on Mars' surface were great oceans. Today we know they are huge dust storms. Track how our knowledge of Mars has changed with this seventh-grader.

wolves

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The Big Chill: Calming Signals Among Wolves

Wolves have long been the favorite animal of this eighth-grader from Illinois. Learn how she turned her interest into an insightful experiment about how wolves calm and comfort each other.

elaine_room1

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Agricultural Genetic Engineering

Are the tomatoes, cheese, and carrots on your table genetically engineered? And if so, why should you care? Wander the aisles of this engaging exhibit, imagined by a 10th-grader from Rhode Island.

gaurav_crabsketch

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Fiddler on the Marsh

Fiddler crabs never stray far from their burrow. That's why they will do anything to avoid getting caught and measured, as this ninth-grader from Virginia found out.

hallie_turtle

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The Circle of the Food Chain and Decomposition

This seventh-grader from Mississippi asked, when it comes to planting a garden, isn't dirt just dirt? Find out what she learned by digging into the study of decomposition and making compost.

ricegrass

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The Indian Ricegrass

For most animals that forage in the southwestern U.S., Indian ricegrass is their number one food choice. This 12th-grader from Arizona asks, what's the best way to monitor it and prevent overgrazing?

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Operation: The Human Genome Project

As you wander through this exhibit by a Wisconsin 11th-grader, you'll be introduced to the Human Genome Project, the scientific benefits it will bring, and the bioethical issues this research raises.

American Museum of Natural History

Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192
Phone: 212-769-5100

Open daily from 10 am - 5:45 pm
except on Thanksgiving and Christmas
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