2002 Sustaining Seascapes: The Science and Policy of Marine Resource Management

The oceans were once widely thought to be as vast as to be essentially immune from human harms.  We now know that anthropogenic threats to marine biodiversity are widespread, and place excessive stresses on species and ecosystem functions.  These stressed systems now exist in highly reduced versions, providing less productivity and less resilience to major disturbances such as epidemic diseases, hurricanes, and climate change.

Sustaining Seascapes: The Science and Policy of Marine Resource Management examined the large-scale conservation of marine ecosystems - considering novel approaches to the sustainable management of biodiversity and fisheries.  Through theory, reviews, and case studies, participants explored efforts to integrate natural, socioeconomic, and cultural factors at local and regional scales in response to ongoing threats to both fisheries and biodiversity.

The symposium was co-sponsored by a consortium of organizations, including Environmental Defense, NOAA's Marine Protected Areas Center, the National Park Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the World Wildlife Fund.