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2011 Student Conference on Conservation Science New York

The second annual Student Conference on Conservation Science-New York was held at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City from 11-14 October.  We Welcomed current students, post-doctoral fellows, a small number of undergraduates, and those who have recently begun working professionally in conservation science.

This year's 270 participants represented 28 countries and 25 states within the U.S.  Some 65 mentors from 31 institutions within science, policy, academia, and management gave generously of their time, meeting with students, providing written and verbal feedback, leading workshops, and offering guidance.  the full agenda included 116 formal presentations (plenaries, talks, speed talks, and posters), nine workshops, nearly 60 mentor-hosted lunch tables, two evening programs, two receptions, and a career fair.

SCCS-NY 2011 was sponsored by the Museum's Center for Biodiversity and Conservation in collaboration with the Yale School of Forestry, Columbia University Earth Institute, Fordham University Graduate School of Arts and Science, Princeton University, and the University of Cambridge.  Partner institutions included Columbia University Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology; Wildlife Conservation Society; EcoHealth Alliance (formerly Wildlife Trust); Smithsonian-Mason Global Conservation Studies Programs; Bard Center for Environmental Policy; Stony Brook University; University of Connecticut; City University of New York; New York City Audubon Society; Rutgers University, SUNY-Environmental Science and Forestry; International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN); Applied BioMathematics, Inc.; and the AMNH Richard Gilder Graduate School.

SCCS-NY is a sister conference to the highly successful SCCS-Cambridge, begun in 2000 by the University of Cambridge, and the newly developed SCCS-Bangalore.


AGENDA

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11

2:00 WORKSHOP SESSION I

EXPANDING YOUR TEACHING TOOLBOX: AN INTRODUCTION TO ACTIVE AND SCIENTIFIC TEACHING APPROACHES
Sackler Lab, 1st floor
Led by: Ana Luz Porzecanski, Associate Director for Capacity Development and NCEP Project Director, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History, New York City, New York USA; and
Martha Groom, Professor, University of Washington Bothell, and Adjunct Professor, University of Washington, Washington State USA

CONFLICTS ABOUT WILDLIFE: IS THE NEXT GENERATION OF CONSERVATION SCIENTISTS PREPARED?
Prof. Development Room No. 2, 2nd floor
Led by: Leo R. Douglas, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History; and Adjunct Lecturer, Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, Columbia University, New York City, New York USA

MANAGING ECOSYSTEM SERVICES FOR CONSERVATION AND POVERTY REDUCTION
Prof. Development Room No. 2, 2nd floor
Led by: Jane Carter Ingram, Lead, Ecosystem Services/Payments for Ecosystem Services, Wildlife Conservation Society, and Adjunct Associate Research Scientist, Center for Environmental Research and Conservation, the Earth Institute, Columbia University, New York City, New York USA


5:30pm FILM and DISCUSSION
Kaufmann/Linder Theaters
GREEN FIRE: ALDO LEOPOLD AND A LAND ETHIC FOR OUR TIME
This poignant documentary follows the professional and personal life of Aldo Leopold, widely regarded as the 20th century’s most important conservationist and a central figure in the development of environmental ethics. “Green Fire” shares intimate details of his loving relationship with his wife and children, which centered around their exploration of nature. The film highlights Leopold’s extraordinary career, revealing how he shaped the debates within the conservation community and continues to inspire people today. The screening will be followed by a discussion with film director Steven Dunsky; Brooke Hecht, President, Center for Humans and Nature; Curt Meine, Director of Conservation Biology and History, Center for Humans and Nature; and Eleanor J. Sterling, Director of the Center for Biodiversity and Conservation at the American Museum of Natural History.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12

9:00 WELCOME and INTRODUCTION
Kaufmann/Linder Theaters
Eleanor J. Sterling, Director, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History, New York City, New York USA

9:20 Plenary Address
TEN REASONS WHY CONSERVATION BIOLOGISTS SHOULD VALUE TROPICAL REGROWTH FORESTS
Robin Chazdon, Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut USA

10:05am Talk Session
CONSERVATION IN HUMAN-MODIFIED LANDSCAPES (PART I)
Session Chair: David Skelly, Professor of Ecology and Associate Dean for Research, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut USA

BETA DIVERSITY OF DUNG BEETLES IN HUMAN- MODIFIED LANDSCAPES
Matthias Rös, Instituto de Ecologia, A.C., Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico

BIRDS IN COFFEE AGROECOSYSTEMS AND HABITAT FRAGMENTATION
Maria Jose La Rota-Aguilera, Department of Geography and the Environment, University of Texas at Austin, Texas USA

EVALUATION OF AMPHIBIAN COMMUNITIES IN CONSTRUCTED PONDS
Robert Denton, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, Kentucky USA

11:45am Talk Session
CONSERVATION IN HUMAN-MODIFIED LANDSCAPES (PART II)
Kaufmann/Linder Theaters
Session Chair: David Skelly, Professor of Ecology and Associate Dean for Research, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut USA

INDIRECT EFFECTS OF FRAGMENTATION LIMIT RAINFOREST BIRDS
Nicole Michel, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana USA

METRICS LINKING FRAGMENTATION TO EXTINCTION AT LARGE SCALES
Jessica Schnell, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey USA

CAN WE PREDICT THE COST OF INVASION IN A PROTECTED AREA?
Gwen Iacona, University of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, Tennessee USA

2:30 pm Speed Talk Session
CONSERVATION IN MANAGED LANDSCAPES
Kaufmann/Linder Theaters
Session Chair: Catherine Christen, Graduate/Professional Training Manager, Center for Conservation Education and Sustainability, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Front Royal, Virginia USA

CONSERVATION VALUE OF COMMUNITY LANDS IN NE MADAGASCAR
Georgina Cullman, Columbia University and American Museum of Natural History, New York City, New York

EFFECTIVENESS OF PROTECTED AREAS IN MAINTAINING BIODIVERSITY
Jonas Geldmann, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

CONNECTIVITY UNDER ALTERNATIVE MODELS OF MARINE CONSERVATION
Catherine González, Programa de Doctorado en Ciencias Biológicas and Estación Costera de Investigaciones Marinas (ECIM)-Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile

REVIEW OF SOLUTIONS TO POPULATION GROWTH AND CLIMATE CHANGE
Darcey Iwashita, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Hawai'i USA

ORGANIC VINEYARD MANAGEMENT SUPPORTS INSECT- FLOWER NETWORKS
Temitope Kehinde, Department of Conservation Ecology and Entomology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, Western Cape Province, South Africa

BRIDGING NATURAL AND MANAGED LANDSCAPES IN CUBAN MAB RESERVES
Jessica Rosen, Bioversity International, Rome, Italy

RODENTICIDE USE AND NON-TARGET IMPACTS IN AN URBAN ECOSYSTEM
Rebecca McKay Steinberg, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Science, New Haven, Connecticut USA

3:45pm Talk Session
ECOSYSTEM CONSERVATION AND POLICY
Kaufmann/Linder Theaters
Session Chair: Joel Cracraft, Chair, Division of Vertebrate Zoology, Lamont Curator and Curator-in-Charge, Department of Ornithology, American Museum of Natural History

ADAPTING FOREST RESTORATION APPROACHES TO LOCAL CONTEXTS
Erica Pohnan, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, New Haven, Connecticut USA

PREDICTING IMPACTS OF AGRICULTURE EVOLUTION ON BIODIVERSITY
Karine Princé, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, France

GLOBAL IMPORTANCE OF FORAGE FISH TO FISHERIES AND ECOSYSTEMS
Konstantine J. Rountos, Institute for Ocean Conservation Science, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York USA

MAHOGANY POPULATION DYNAMICS: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL TRADE
Christopher Free, International Institute of Tropical Forestry, Middlebury, Vermont USA

4:50 POSTER SESSION / RECEPTION
Powerhouse, 2nd Floor


7:00 2011 MACK LIPKIN MAN AND NATURE SERIES
THIS YEAR IN CONSERVATION: A PANEL DISCUSSION
Kaufmann/Linder Theaters

Four conservation professionals explore the important events, milestones, and innovations that have challenged and inspired conservation action on the world stage and in their own careers. Introduced by Michael J. Novacek, Senior Vice President, Provost of Science, American Museum of Natural History. The evening’s panelists:

Gabriela Chavarria, Science Advisor to the Director, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC
Christopher Filardi, Director of Pacific Programs, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History
Eleanor J. Sterling, (Moderator) Director, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History
Erika Zavaleta, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz, California

The Mack Lipkin Man and Nature Series was established in honor of Dr. Mack Lipkin, Sr., by his many friends and admirers. Dr. Lipkin was a physician who was a gentle and powerful force towards advancing the most humane and caring practices of medicine.


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13

9:00 INTRODUCTION
Kaufmann / Linder Theaters

9:10 Plenary Address
WHY NATURAL HISTORY MATTERS
Christopher E. Filardi, Director, Pacific Programs, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation,American Museum of Natural History

9:55am Talk Session
CONSERVATION AND CLIMATE CHANGE
Session Chair: Eban Goodstein, Director, Bard Center for Environmental Policy, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York

AGRICULTURAL ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE VARIABILITY
Meha Jain, Columbia University, New York, New York USA

CLIMATE MITIGATION AND CORRIDORS FOR CHIMPANZEES IN UGANDA
Patrick Jantz, Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, Massachusetts USA

ENVIRONMENTAL PREDICTORS OF FOREST PRESENCE AND COMPOSITION
Kendra Mack, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, New Haven, Connecticut USA

RETHINKING CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION
Nicole Wilson, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York USA

11:35am Talk Session
SOCIO-ECONOMIC DIMENSIONS OF CONSERVATION
Kaufmann/Linder
Session Chair: Eban Goodstein, Director, Bard Center for Environmental Policy, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York

TIME, HISTORY, AND NARRATIVE AT THE TIJUANA RIVER ESTUARY
Emma Johnson, University of California, San Diego, California USA

ISLAND CONSERVATION: A COMMUNITY BASED APPROACH IN UTILA, HONDURAS
Jessica Daniel, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA

SCALE MISMATCHES AND THE ROLE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS
Angela Guerrero Gonzalez, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

PEOPLE- PARK RELATIONS AROUND CHOBE NATIONAL PARK, BOTSWANA
Clare Gupta, University of California, Berkeley, California USA

CONSERVATION ACROSS BOUNDARIES IN THE BIG BEND BORDERLANDS
Geoff Kelley, Department of Anthropology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia USA

THREATS TO BIODIVERSITY IN THE U MINH PEAT SWAMPS, VIETNAM
Rachel Nuwer, University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, England, United Kingdom; and New York University, New York City, New York USA Master’s completed

3:00pm Speed Talk Session
UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING SPECIES INTERACTION
Kaufmann/Linder
Session Chair: Sir Peter Crane, Carl W. Knobloch, Jr. Dean of the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and Professor of Botany, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

QUANTIFYING NATIVE BEE POLLINATION SERVICES IN FRUIT CROPS
Sarah Kornbluth, Rutgers University, Newark, New Jersey USA

PLANTS AND POLLINATORS: KNOW YOUR (FUNCTIONAL) ROLE!
Daniel S. Song, Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

THE STUDY OF FAUNA DIVERSITY IN JAPANESE LARCH PLANTATION
Binbin Li, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan USA

STRESSED SHARKS: MODELING BETTER CATCH AND RELEASE FISHING
Austin Gallagher, Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy, University of Miami, Miami, Florida USA

CAN SOCIAL BEHAVIORS PROTECT POPULATIONS FROM EXTINCTION?
Jennifer Mortensen, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts USA

FROG DEFENSE: DOES AMPHIBIAN SKIN PROTECT FROM A PANDEMIC?
Samantha Attwood, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

ARE AMPHIBIAN DECLINES ALTERING STREAM ECOSYSTEM PROCESSES?
Amanda Rugenski, Department of Zoology and Center for Ecology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois USA

4:15pm Talk Session
AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPES AND BIODIVERSITY
Kaufmann/Linder
Session Chair: Ana Carolina Carnaval, Assistant Professor, Biology Department, The City College of New York, New York City

BONOBOS CROP-RAID DURING TIMES OF NUTRITIONAL STRESS
Alexander Georgiev, Harvard University, Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Cambridge, Massachusetts USA

BLACKBUCK AND AGRICULTURISTS: CONFLICT OR COEXISTENCE?
Chaitanya Krishna, Centre for Ecological Sciences, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

EFFECTS OF OIL PALM ON BIRD COMMUNITIES IN PERUVIAN AMAZON
Priya Alicia Srinivas, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology, Columbia University, New York City, New York USA

DISAPPEARING SHADE TREES REDUCES ‘ECO’ IN ECOAGRICULTURE
Aske Skovmand Bosselmann, Forest & Landscape, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

FARMER CONSERVATION OF PLANT DIVERSITY FOR FOOD IN ETHIOPIA
Morgan Ruelle, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York USA

5:30 POSTER SESSION / CAREER FAIR / RECEPTION


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14

9:00 INTRODUCTION
Kaufmann / Linder Theaters

9:10 Plenary Address
CONTRIBUTING TO EFFECTIVE CONSERVATION AS A SCIENTIST
Erica Zavaleta, Assistant Professor, Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz

9:55am Speed Talk
CHALLENGES AND INNOVATIONS IN SPECIES CONSERVATION
Kaufmann / Linder Theaters
Session Chair: George Amato, Director, Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, American Museum of Natural History, New York City, New York USA

NONINVASIVE TRACKING OF JAGUARS (Panthera onca) IN BELIZE
Claudia Wultsch, Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia USA

PALMYRA ATOLL GREEN TURTLE FORAGING ECOLOGY
Brooke Kelly, Columbia University, Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, New York City, New York, USA

STATUS AND VIABILITY OF THE LILIANS LOVEBIRD IN MALAWI
Tiwonge Mzumara, Museum of Malawi, University of Kwazulu Natal, Blantyre, Southern Region, Malawi

LOW COMPLIANCE WITH A BYCATCH REGULATION THREATENS TERRAPINS
Thomas Radzio, Department of Biological Sciences, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA

USE OF OCCUPANCY SURVEYS TO MONITOR CLARK’S NUTCRACKERS
Taza Schaming, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York USA

PRE- AND POST-REINTRODUCTION GENETICS OF GOLDEN EAGLES
Maria Wheeler, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania USA

11:05 Talk Session
SPECIES ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION
(Kaufmann/Linder)
Session Chair: Ana Luz Porzecanski, Associate Director for Capacity Development and NCEP Project Director, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History, New York City, New York USA

BEHAVIORAL DETERMINANTS OF DISEASE TRANSMISSION IN WILD APES
Julie Rushmore, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia USA

ABUNDANCE ESTIMATION OF COYOTE POPULATIONS IN NEW YORK STATE
Sara Hansen, State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, New York, USA

CONSERVATION BASED ON NEUTRAL AND ADAPTIVE GENETIC VARIATION
Rodrigo Vergara, University of Florida

AN ECOLOGICAL AND GENETIC STUDY OF EURASIAN OTTERS IN ISRAEL
Tali Magory Cohen, Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel

GALÁPAGOS GIANT TORTOISES AS ECOLOGICAL ANALOGS
Elizabeth Hunter, State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, New York, USA

GENETIC EVALUATION OF AMERICAN SHAD RESTORATION SUCCESS
Aaron Aunins, Virginia Commonwealth University, Virginia USA

2:15 WORKSHOP SESSION II

MODELING ECOLOGICAL RISK WITH RAMAS METAPOP SOFTWARE
Sackler Lab, 1st floor
Led by: Nicholas A. Friedenberg and Kevin Shoemaker, Applied Biomathematics, Setaukaet, New York

IS THE NEXT GENERATION OF CONSERVATION SCIENTISTS PREPARED?
Kaufmann Theater, 1st floor
Led by: Leo R. Douglas, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History; and Adjunct Lecturer, Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, Columbia University, New York City, New York

ADVANCES IN MONITORING AND QUANTITATIVE ECOLOGY IN CONSERVATION SCIENCE
Professional Development Room No. 1, 2nd floor
Led by: Benjamin Zuckerberg, Assistant Professor, Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin; James P. Gibbs, Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Environmental and Forest Biology, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York; and Wesley Hochachka, Senior Research Associate, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York

AN INTRODUCTION TO ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT – PRACTICAL TRAINING FOR TOMORROW’S LEADERS IN CONSERVATION
Prof. Development Room No. 2, 2nd floor
Led by: Vinaya Swaminathan, Program Officer, Foundations of Success

MODELING ECOLOGICAL NICHES AND GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS: WHAT, WHY AND HOW?
Linder Theater, 1st floor
Led by: Richard Pearson, Director, Biodiversity Informatics Research, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History, New York City, New York

THE TWO MOST IMPORTANT THINGS YOU EVER DO: HARMONIZING FAMILY AND CAREER
Kaufmann Theater, 1st floor
Led by: Erica Zavaleta, Assistant Professor, Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz and
Helen Fox, Senior Marine Conservation Biologist, World Wildlife Fund, with invited panelists

5:20 AWARDS AND CLOSING

6:00 ADJOURN

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