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2012 Student Conference on Conservation Science New York

The third annual Student Conference on Conservation Science-New York was held at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City from 9-12 October 2012.  We welcomed current students, post-doctoral fellows, a small number of undergraduate students, and those who have recently begun working in conservation science.

This year's 260 participants represented 28 countries and 25 U.S. states.  Nearly 60 mentors from over 20 institutions within science, policy, academia, and management gave generously of their time, meeting with students, providing written and verbal feedback, leading workshops, and offering guidance.  The full agenda included 90 formal presentations (talks, speed talks, and posters), six workshops, two mentor-hosted lunches, two public programs, two receptions, and a resource and career fair.

SCCS-NY 2012 was organized by the American Museum of Natural History’s Center for Biodiversity and Conservation in partnership with the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Columbia University Earth Institute, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation, Princeton University, Fordham University, and the University of Cambridge.  The conference benefited greatly from the support provided by experts and mentors from Archipelago Consulting, Bard College, Barnard College, City University of New York, Clarkson University, Clemson University, Columbia University, EcoHealth Alliance, Foundations of Success, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, International Peace Park Exhibitions, International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), Rutgers University, Stony Brook University, United States Geological Survey (USGS), University of Florida, University of Maine, and University of Miami.

SCCS-NY is a sister conference to the highly successful SCCS-Cambridge, begun in 2000 by the University of Cambridge, SCCS-Bangalore, and the newly developed SCCS-Australia.


AGENDA

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9

Special pre-conference event
QUESTIONS FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
Hosted by the Center for Humans and Nature and the American Museum of Natural History

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE HUMAN?
David Sloan Wilson, SUNY Distinguished Professor, Departments of Biology and Anthropology, Binghamton University

TO BUILD OR NOT TO BUILD A ROAD...HOW DO WE HONOR THE LANDSCAPE?
Nina-Marie Lister, Associate Professor, School of Urban Design and Regional Planning, Ryerson University, Toronto; and Visiting Associate Professor, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University
Ingrid Stefanovic, Professor of Philosphy, University of Toronto

Panel Discussion
Moderator: Eleanor Sterling, Ph.D., Director, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History
David Sloan Wilson, SUNY Distinguished Professor, Departments of Biology and Anthropology, Binghamton University
Nina-Marie Lister, Associate Professor, School of Urban Design and Regional Planning, Ryerson University, Toronto; and Visiting Associate Professor, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University
Ingrid Stefanovic, Professor of Philosphy, University of Toronto

HOW DO YOU ENVISION A SUCCESSFUL ECONOMY WITHOUT CONTINUOUS ECONOMIC GROWTH?
Richard Howarth, Pat and John Rosenwald Professor, Dartmouth College and Editor-in-Chief, Ecological Economics
Peter Victor, Professor in Environmental Studies, York University

Panel Discussion
Moderator: Brooke Hecht, Ph.D., President, Center for Humans and Nature
Richard Howarth, Pat and John Rosenwald Professor, Dartmouth College and Editor-in-Chief, Ecological Economics
Peter Victor, Professor in Environmental Studies, York University


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10

9:00 WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION
Kaufmann / Linder Theaters
Eleanor J. Sterling, Director, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History

Plenary Address
RESTORATION AND RECIPROCITY: INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE IN ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION
Robin Kimmerer, Professor and Director, Center for Native Peoples, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York

9:55 Talk Session
PRIORITY-SETTING AND MODELING IN CONSERVATION
Kauffman / Linder Theaters
Session Chair: Eleanor J. Sterling, Director, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History

PHYLOGENETIC CONSERVATION PRIORITIES FOR SHARKS
Ximena Velez-Zuazo, University of Puerto Rico

MODERN THREATS TO OLDER SPECIES: EVOLUTIONARY AGE AND EXTINCTION RISK IN MAMMALS
Luis Darcy Verde Arregoitia, University of Queensland, Australia

TRACKING AND MODELLING DEEPWATER HORIZON DISASTER IMPACT ON DEEP CORAL COMMUNITIES
Pen-Yuan Hsing, Pennsylvania State University

WHAT TO INVENTORY IN A CHANGING WORLD? IZEMBEK NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE: A CASE STUDY
Didem Ikis, Pennsylvania State Universit

11:30 Talk Session
GENETIC TOOLS FOR CONSERVATION
Kaufmann / Linder Theaters
Session Chair: George Amato, Director, Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, American Museum of Natural History

GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE ISLAND LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE, Lanius ludovicianus anthonyi
Isabel Caballero, Texas A&M University

CONSERVATION AND GENETICS OF THE ALLEN CAYS ROCK IGUANA (Cyclura cychlura inornata)
Andrea Aplasca, Fordham University

GENETIC STRUCTURE OF LEOPARDS IN THE SATPURA- MAIKAL LANDSCAPE OF CENTRAL INDIA
Trishna Dutta, Smithsonian Institution

ADAPTIVE GENETIC VARIABILITY IN THE MARBLED MURRELET: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONSERVATION
Catalina Vasquez Carrillo, University of Wisconsin-Madison

LUNCH: MENTOR-HOSTED TABLES

2:15 Speed Talk Session
UNDERSTANDING SPECIES RESPONSES TO CHANGING ENVIRONMENTS
Kaufmann / Linder Theaters
Session Chair: Jason Munshi-South, Assistant Professor, Baruch College & The Graduate Center, City University of New York

A CENTURY OF CHANGE IN SMALL MAMMAL POPULATIONS IN THE TAHOE BASIN, CALIFORNIA
Christina Frare, Fordham University

HOPPING INTO NEW TERRITORY: A CASE OF AMPHIBIAN RANGE EXPANSION IN NEW JERSEY
Paola Dolcemascolo, Montclair State University

TESTING PREDICTIVE ABILITY OF BIOCLIMATIC ENVELOPE MODELS USING DATA FROM ALASKA
Tatiana Escovar, Columbia University

MODELING THE HABITAT PREFERENCE OF LARGE MAMMALS AT MULTIPLE LANDSCAPE SCALES
Andrew Mashintonio, Rutgers University

GENETIC TOOLS FOR DETECTING HYBRIDIZATION IN NATIVE RAINBOW TROUT
Bjorn Erickson, University of California, Davis

FUEL TREATMENT IMPACTS ON POST-WILDFIRE DYNAMICS IN DRY CONIFER FORESTS OF CALIFORNIA
Jens Stevens, University of California, Davis

LIVING ON THE EDGE: WETLAND ECOTONES AS PEAK REFUGIA FROM AN INTRODUCED PREDATOR
Andrea Reid, McGill University, Canada

POPULATION GENETICS OF NEOTROPIC COUGARS (Puma concolor)
Anthony Caragiulo, Fordham University

Speed Talk Discussion

3:45 Talk Session
ADVANCING CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT TOOLS AND APPROACHES
Kaufmann / Linder Theaters
Session Chair: Shahid Naeem, Professor of Ecology, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology, Columbia University

HUMPBACK WHALE ISOTOPE SIGNATURES: POPULATION STRUCTURE AND MANAGEMENT IMPLICATIONS
Alyson Fleming, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

LANDSCAPE FEATURES INFLUENCING LIVESTOCK DEPREDATION IN THE MAASAI STEPPE
Sam Baraso, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University

RECIPROCAL PREDATION MEDIATES THE CO- PERSISTENCE OF NATIVE AND NON-NATIVE SPECIES
Sujan Henkanaththegedara, North Dakota State University

DIFFERENCES IN ELASMOBRANCH ASSEMBLAGES BETWEEN MARINE RESERVES AND FISHED REEFS
Mark Bond, SUNY Stony Brook

PATCH SELECTION MODELS EVALUATE EFFECTS OF CONFLICT MANAGEMENT ON WILDLIFE FORAGING
Sharon Baruch-Mordo, Colorado State University

5:10 POSTER SESSION / RECEPTION
Astor Turret and Fossil Mammal Array, 4th floor
Sponsored in part by the Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation


7:00 pm
2012 Mack Lipkin Man and Nature Series
THIS YEAR IN CONSERVATION: A PANEL DISCUSSION
Kaufmann / Linder Theaters

Four conservation professionals explore the important events, milestones, and innovations that have challenged and inspired conservation action on the world stage and in their own careers. Introduced by Michael J. Novacek, Senior Vice President, Provost of Science at the American Museum of Natural History.

Moderator: Eleanor J. Sterling, Director, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History

Panelists
Avecita Chicchón, Andes-Amazon Initiative at the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
Malcolm L. Hunter, Jr., Libra Professor of Conservation Biology, Department of Wildlife Ecology, University of Maine
Robin Kimmerer, Center for Native Peoples, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11

9:00 Talk Session
CONSERVATION OF HUMAN-NATURAL SYSTEMS
Kaufmann / Linder Theaters
Session Chair: Martha Groom, Professor, University of Washington Bothell & Adjunct Professor, University of Washington

MODELING DYNAMIC ECOSYSTEM PROCESSES WITHIN AND BEYOND URBAN CONSERVATION BOUNDARIES
Valeria Pasquarella, Boston University

BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN CHANGING ETHIOPIAN COFFEE AGROECOSYSTEMS
Getachew Eshete, University of California, Santa Cruz

RANGELAND CONSERVATION AND PASTORALIST RESOURCE-USE DECISIONS DURING DROUGHTS
Brian Miller, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

PLANT DIVERSITY AND VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS OF PHILIPPINE INDIGENOUS UPLAND ECOSYSTEMS
Rico Ancog, University of the Phillippines, Los Baños

MITIGATION OF HUMAN-FELID CONFLICT IN THE FACE OF A QUICKLY RISING HUMAN POPULATION
Jennifer McCarthy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

11:00 Talk Session
RESTORING LANDSCAPES, ECOSYSTEMS, AND SPECIES
Kaufmann / Linder Theaters
Session Chair: Elizabeth Johnson, Metropolitan Program Manager, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History

HERBIVORE ENHANCEMENT AS A TOOL FOR REEF RESTORATION
Emily Kelly, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

ECOLOGICAL VALUE OF RESTORED WETLANDS IN THE ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY OF NEW YORK
Catherine Benson, Clarkson University

NATURAL RECOVERY OF TSUNAMI AFFECTED LITTORAL FORESTS IN NICOBAR ISLANDS, INDIA
Nehru Prabakaran, Salim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History

USING PLANT FUNCTIONAL TRAITS TO REFINE ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION TECHNIQUES
Vanessa Boukili, University of Connecticut

INDICATORS AND DRIVERS OF HABITAT QUALITY AND WATER QUALITY IN INLAND MICHIGAN LAKES
Zach Hecht-Leavitt, New York Department of State

EXOTIC TREES FACILITATE NATIVE FOREST REGENERATION ON ABANDONED FARMLAND
Aerin Jacob, McGill University, Canada

LUNCH: MENTOR-HOSTED TABLES

2:30 Speed Talk Session
UNDERSTANDING HUMAN IMPACT AND POTENTIAL IN CONSERVATION
Kaufmann / Linder Theaters
Session Chair: Ana Luz Porzecanski, Associate Director for Capacity Development and NCEP Project Director, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History

DISAPPEARANCE OF A LIVING FOSSIL: POPULATION ASSESSMENTS OF Nautilus Sp.
Gregory Barord, City University of New York Graduate Center and Brooklyn College

USING mtDNA TO IDENTIFY PRIMATE CAPTURE HOTSPOTS FOR THE ILLEGAL PET TRADE IN BELIZE
Lillian Parker, George Mason University

PHYLOGEOGRAPHY AND GEOGRAPHIC ORIGIN OF THE INVASIVE NILE MONITOR, Varanus niloticus
Stephanie Dowell, Fordham University

SMALL FARMERS AND DEFORESTATION ON THE AGRICULTURAL FRONTIER OF MISIONES
Theodore Varns, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Sciences

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY IN A POST-DISASTER CONTEXT: HAITI, A CASE STUDY
Daniel Abrahams, Johns Hopkins University

COMMUNITY STEWARDSHIP FOR DHOLE CONSERVATION IN KANGCHENJUNGA, NEPAL
Ambika Pd. Khatiwada, National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC), Nepal

PREDICTING VOLUNTEER ACTIONS TO PRIORITISE SURVEYING ACROSS LARGE SCALES
Ayesha Tulloch, University of Queensland, Australia

URBAN GREEN ROOFS AS MIGRATORY BIRD HABITAT
Dustin Partridge, Fordham University

Speed Talk Discussion

4:00 Plenary Address
“REACHING BEYOND THE CHOIR” AND OTHER CAREER LESSONS FROM THE HISTORY OF CONSERVATION BIOLOGY
Malcolm L. Hunter, Jr., Libra Professor of Conservation Biology, Department of Wildlife Ecology University of Maine

AWARDS AND CLOSING
Kaufmann / Linder Theaters

RESOURCE & CAREER FAIR / RECEPTION
Astor Turret & Fossil Mammal Array, 4th floor


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12

9:00 WORKSHOP SESSION I

ENVIRONMENTAL PEACEBUILDING - INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARKS AND TRANSBOUNDARY CONSERVATION (180 min)
Kaufmann Theater, 1st Floor
Led by: J. Todd Walters, Executive Director, International Peace Park Exhibitions & Fellow, Institute for Environmental Diplomacy & Security

EXPANDING YOUR TEACHING TOOLBOX: AN INTRODUCTION TO ACTIVE AND SCIENTIFIC TEACHING APPROACHES (180 min) Sackler Education Laboratory, 1st Floor
Led by: Ana Luz Porzecanski, Associate Director for Capacity Development and NCEP Project Director, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History and
Martha Groom, Professor, University of Washington Bothell & Adjunct Professor University of Washington

CONFLICTS ABOUT WILDLIFE: PREPARING THE NEXT GENERATION OF CONSERVATION SCIENTISTS (90 min)
Linder Theater, 1st Floor
Led by: Leo R. Douglas, Visiting Scientist, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History

10:30 am
HARNESSING SOCIAL MEDIA FOR CONSERVATION (90 min)
Linder Theater, 1st Floor
Led by: Colin Donihue, Ph.D. student, Yale University

2:00 WORKSHOP SESSION II

MODELING ECOLOGICAL NICHES AND GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTIONS: WHAT, WHY, AND HOW? (180 min)
RGGS Lecture Hall, 5th Floor
Led by: Richard Pearson, Director, Biodiversity Informatics Research, Center for Biodiversity and Conservation, American Museum of Natural History

AN INTRODUCTION TO ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT: PRACTICAL TRAINING FOR TOMORROW’S LEADERS IN CONSERVATION (180 min)
Kathryn W. Davis Science Teaching Classroom, 2nd Floor
Led by: Vinaya Swaminathan, Program Officer, Foundations of Success (FOS) and
Kate Christen, Training Manager, Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation

5:00 ADJOURN

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