Biocultural Approaches to Resilience Across Scales

A collage of images depicting people and landscapes

Biocultural approaches start with and build upon local values, knowledge, and needs while recognizing the interplay between the cultural and biological parts of a system. At the CBC, we use these approaches to collaborate with communities and explore how to manage and adapt for resilience in a way that is culturally appropriate and can be communicated at the national and international levels

The CBC has several active projects aimed at supporting biocultural approaches to management across scales. On a global level, we look at how people think about and use biocultural approaches in order to improve our understanding of the variety of tools and techniques in use. We further focus on providing opportunities for sharing information and best practices across linguistic, cultural, and disciplinary divides, and fostering the use of locally-grounded knowledge and values for culturally appropriate monitoring and resource management.

Biocultural Indicators

Effective monitoring and evaluation are fundamental to understanding the success of conservation and sustainable management projects. However, often the tools and indicators used to assess community-level resilience are developed with little to no input from those very communities. When local voices are not adequately represented at the national and international level, this disconnect can lead to the development and use of evaluative metrics that are inconsistent with local realities and needs. 

Across projects, we are developing indicators and frameworks for indicators that accurately reflect local realities and also can translate to the global level. At the global level, we are also working to understand how people and organizations are currently using biocultural indicator metrics, what works best under what conditions, and where there are knowledge gaps or areas for further strengthening.


The CBC's work on biocultural indicators is led by Chief Conservation Scientist, Dr. Eleanor Sterling. Watch her Yale Wilbur Cross Medal Lecture on the CBC's biocultural work, given while she was honored as one of the 2016 recipients of the prestigious award.

Related pages: 
             
Partners and collaborators:  
Solomon Islands Community Conservation Partnership Ecological Solutions, Solomon Islands                  
Wildlife conservation society logo

Wildlife Conservation Society
WorldFish
Kastom Gaden Association World Vegetable Center
Solomon Islands Government, Ministry for Environment, Climate Change and Disaster Management, and the Ministry of Health and Medical Services 
UNESCO-SCBD joint programme logo

UNESCO-SCBD Joint Programme on the Links Between Biological and Cultural Diversity
University of Queensland