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Genus Lampsilis

Family Unionidae

Lampsilis

Status:

Seven Lampsilis species are recorded from New York State, of which two are known from the metro area: Lampsilis cariosa, and L. radiata. Both have wide distributions along the Atlantic slope where they remain generally common to abundant. In the metro area however both species are much less common, and L. cariosa is listed as a species of Special Concern in Connecticut. Lampsilis abrupta, which also occurs in New York State, is Federally listed as Endangered.

 

Species Summaries

Species summary

Lampsilis cariosa (Say, 1817)
yellow lampmussel

 
 

Features:

size: 100mm, rarely to 120mm
beak: weakly double-looped, moderately swollen but not much elevated
color patterns: thin green color rays absent or confined to posterior shell only
nacre: bluish-white
shape: sub-ovate with evenly rounded margin; sexually dimorphic shape
shell features: clear, glossy, yellow periostracum
teeth: two pseudocardinals in left valve and one in right; pseudocardinals and laterals well-developed but variable in shape

Status:

abundance: rare
status: US, NY: not legally protected; NJ: threatened; CT: special concern (extirpated) IUCN: endangered
conservation challenges: More needs to be known about the current distribution of this species in metro area Connecticut and New Jersey especially

Distribution:

N.A. distribution: Nova Scotia (Canada) to Georgia
present metro distribution: NY: Hudson River watershed, scattered other areas; NJ: Ramapo River (lower Hudson River watershed), upper Delaware River watershed; CT: not present in metro area
other regional localities: NY: upper Hudson River watershed, Susquehanna River watershed; NJ: no information; CT: may occur in Connecticut River watershed
historical localities: NY: Lake Ontario watershed, upper Delaware River watershed; NJ: Passaic and Raritan Rivers (lower Hudson River watershed); CT: lower Connecticut River watershed; Housatonic River watershed

yllwlmpmusselsmall

Life History:

habitat: small to large rivers with moderate to fast flow, especially in riffles. Preferred substrate sand and gravel, or shifting sands downstream from large boulders. Species of Lampsilis favor rivers, but may be found as well in streams and lakes where they tolerate a wide range of conditions. In the metro area they are most likely to be found in the Hudson and Delaware River watersheds, and some species are often among the most abundant taxa in their community Habitat Photo
hosts: Morone americana (Gmelin, 1789) white perch; Perca flavescens (Mitchill, 1814) yellow perch

Plates

L. cariosa

Left view

left view


 
Right view

right view


 
Dorsal view

dorsal view
shell shape bulbous


Profile view

profile view;
shape subovate; periostracum glossy


 
 
Nacre

nacre bright white


 
Pseudocardinals

pseudocardinals and laterals present


 
Lateral

lateral teeth fine, distinct


Pseudocardinal teeth

pseudocardinal teeth prominent


 

 

 

Species Summaries

Lampsilis radiata (Gmelin, 1791)
eastern lampmussel

 
 
Features:

size: 100mm
beak: doubled looped sculpture with umbos extending above the hinge line
color pattern: numerous dark green color rays across the shell face; periostracum yellowish to brownish green; nacre tinged with pink or salmon
shape: sub-ovate elliptical with evenly-rounded margin, sexes exhibit slight dimorphism
shell features: slightly roughened, wrinkled, greenish-yellow periostracum
teeth: long, well-developed but not heavy; two pseudocardinals in right and left valves

Status:

abundance:
common status: U.S., NY, NJ, CT: not legally protected
conservation challenges: Not a species of conservation concern, but additional populations and sites should be sought

Distribution:

N.A. distribution: Nova Scotia (Canada) south to South Carolina along the Atlantic drainage; Lake Ontario westward through Lake Huron and the Lake Superior basins
present metro distribution: NY: Delaware River watershed; NJ: Passaic and Ramapo River watersheds, Budd Lake (lower Delaware River watershed), Wallkill River (upper Hudson River watershed); CT: not in metro area
other regional localities: NY: Oswego River watershed, Richelieu River watershed (= Lake Champlain watershed), St. Lawrence River watershed, upper Hudson River watershed, upper Susquehanna River watershed; NJ: no information; CT: Connecticut, Housatonic, Thames River and South central coast watersheds
historical localities: NY: Lake Ontario watershed; NJ: Newton Lake/creek (lower Delaware River watershed), Morris Canal and upper Saddle River (lower Hudson River watershed)

estrnlmpmusselsmall

Life History:

habitat: most creeks, rivers and lakes; found in all types of flows and a wide variety of substrates but favors coarse sand and gravel Habitat Photo
hosts: Ambloplites rupestris (Rafinesque, 1817) rock bass; Lepomis gibbosus (Linnaeus, 1758) pumpkinseed; Lepomis cyanellus (Rafinesque, 1819) bluegill; Lepomis megalotis (Rafinesque, 1820) longear sunfish; Micropterus dolomica (Lacepede, 1802) smallmouth bass; Micropterus salmoides (Lacepede, 1802) largemouth bass; Morone americana (Gmelin, 1789) white perch; Natropis ludibundus (Girard, 1856) sand shiner; Perca flavescens (Mitchill, 1814) yellow perch; Pimephales notatus (Rafinesque, 1820) bluntnose minnow; Poxomis nigromaculatus (Lesueur, 1829) black crappie

Plates

L. radiata

Left view

left view


 
Right view

right view


 
Dorsal view

dorsal view
shell not bulbous


Profile view

profile view
shape sub-ovate; strong color rays


 
 
Nacre

nacre white or pink


 
Hinge teeth

hinge teeth present


 
Beak

beak with double-looped sculpture;
periostracum roughened


Pseudocardinal

pseudocardinal and laterals
well-developed but variable


 

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