Staff Profiles

Bernardo F. Santos

PhD Student, Richard Gilder Graduate School
PhD Student, Richard Gilder Graduate School

Email:
bsantosSPAMFILTER@amnh.org
Phone:
646-283-7080
Curriculum Vitae (short version)
  • Education

    Education

      2012– Ph.D. in Comparative Biology
      Richard Gilder Graduate School, American Museum of Natural History
      Thesis: "Systematics and morphological evolution of cryptine wasps (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Cryptinae)"
      Advisor: James Carpenter

      2009–2011 Master of Science in Biologia Animal [Animal Biology]
      Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo – UFES Vitória, Brazil
      Thesis: "Phylogenetic and taxonomic revision of Messatoporus Cushman (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Cryptinae), with description of sixty-seven new species"
      Advisor: Alexandre P. Aguiar

      2005–2008 Bachelor of Science in Ciências Biológicas [Biology]
      Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo – UFES, Vitória, Brazil
      Honors thesis: "Phylogeny and taxonomy of Loxopus Townes and Baltazaria Townes (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Cryptinae), with description of ten new species"
      Advisor: Alexandre P. Aguiar

  • Research Interests

    Research Interests

      My research focuses on the systematics and evolutionary biology of a hyperdiverse, but neglected group of insects, the cryptine parasitic wasps (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae). I am interested in the evolutionary history of these wasps on its own, but also in using the observed patterns to investigate more general questions in ecology and evolution. Right now I am focused on the interplay between the variety of life history traits associated with parasitism and phenotypic evolution in cryptine wasps. Cryptines attack a wide variety of hosts, most of them concealed to various degrees, from leaf rolls to tree logs. Therefore, several taxa developed a number of morphological adaptations to find and assess deeply concealed hosts. I am using a phylogenetic framework to investigate how many times these characters evolved; if they are correlated or decoupled in the cryptine tree of life; and how these traits impact general body shape in cryptine wasps. The hypothesis is that host-location adaptations constitute a complex functional system that imposes constrains in the evolution of body shape in cryptine wasps.

  • Teaching Experience

    Teaching Experience