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Dino Tour

The American Museum of Natural History has one of the greatest fossil collections in the world. It is especially known for its dinosaur fossils. Museum scientists interpret fossilized bones, teeth, skin, and even footprints to better understand the world of dinosaurs and their descendants. 

Baroasurus_smalldynamiclead
Barosaurus

Reenacting a hypothetical drama between predator and prey, the Museum's popular Barosaurus display shows the enormous plant-eating dinosaur rearing up to protect its young against an attacking Allosaurus.

Floor: 2nd Floor | Exhibit Hall: Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda

Tyrannosaurus rex
Tyrannosaurus rex

The 4-foot-long jaw, the 6-inch-long teeth, the massive thigh bones—almost everything about Tyrannosaurus rex indicates the enormous power of one of the largest theropod dinosaurs that ever existed.

Floor: 4th Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs

Stegosaurus
Stegosaurus

At one time, some scientists thought Stegosaurus had a second brain because the one in its head seemed so small. Stegosaurus did, however, manage with one small brain.

Floor: 4th Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs

The Glen Rose Trackway
The Glen Rose Trackway

The Glen Rose Trackway is a 107-million-year-old series of fossilized dinosaur footprints. Excavated from the bed of the Paluxy River in Texas, the trackway gives a picture of dinosaurs that in some ways is more striking than that offered by fossils.

Floor: 4th Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs

Apatosaurus
Apatosaurus

The Museum's Apatosaurus, collected in the late 1890s, was the first sauropod dinosaur ever mounted. Museum preparators labored over the specimen for years before it went on view in 1905. It has been a focal point of the collection ever since.

Floor: 4th Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs

Dinosaur Mummy
Dinosaur Mummy

The Museum’s dinosaur mummy is a fossilized imprint of the carcass of a duck-billed dinosaur. One of the most complete pieces of Mesozoic dinosaur remains ever found, this fossil represents one of the greatest discoveries in the history of paleontology.

Floor: 4th Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs

Deinonychus
Deinonychus

At 7 feet long, Deinonychus belonged to a group of dinosaurs called maniraptors, or "hand-robbers." Its hands and feet were equipped with sharp claws for catching and grasping prey. The dinosaur's hollow bones and long legs indicate swift and agile movement.

Floor: 4th Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs

Triceratops
Triceratops

This 65-million-year-old Triceratops has a large frill on the back of its skull, two large horns over its eyes, and a smaller horn on its nose. On the side of the skull on display is a partially healed injury, perhaps caused by a conflict with another Triceratops.

Floor: 4th Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs

Duck Billed Dinosaur
Duck-Billed Dinosaur

Anatotitan was a duck-billed dinosaur, one of the most widespread dinosaur groups. About 70 million years ago, duck-billed dinosaurs lived in the Americas, Europe, and Asia. Their habitats varied from forests in river valleys to swamps in coastal floodplains.

Floor: 4th Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs

Coelophysis
Coelophysis

Museum explorers uncovered these Coelophysis specimens in a "death assemblage," in which a group of the same animal is found preserved. It is thought that these sites are the results of flooding, when carcasses were washed into a muddy pond and covered with silt.

Floor: 4th Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs

Psittacosaurus
Psittacosaurus

At 4 feet long and 2 feet tall, Psittacosaurus (pronounced sih-TACK-oh-sore-us) lived some 100 million years ago. Despite the fact that it didn't have any horns, Psittacosaurus was a member of the same group as Triceratops.

Floor: 4th Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs

Corythosaurus
Corythosaurus

Corythosaurus is a member of the group of duck-billed dinosaurs called hadrosaurs, which walked and ran on their two hind legs. The species’ strange skull is capped by a crescent-shaped helmet that contains extended tubes, which formed elaborate nasal passages.

Floor: 4th Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs

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Hall of the Universe

Cullman Hall of the Universe

The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Hall of the Universe, located on the lower level of the Rose Center for Earth and Space, presents the discoveries of modern astrophysics. Divided into four zones, the hall covers the formation, evolution, and properties of stars, planets, galaxies, and the universe.

Food Court

Food Court

This is the food court.

Hall Cullman Hall of the Universe
Cafe Food Court
Floor-1st-Level
Hall of Meteorites

Hall of Meteorites

The Arthur Ross Hall of Meteorites explores essential questions about the origins of our solar system some 4.6 billion years ago by examining meteorites, rocky fragments from space that reveal clues about the formation and evolution of the Sun and planets.

Hall of Planet Earth

Hall of Planet Earth

The David S. and Ruth L. Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth, the first part of the Rose Center to open in June 1999, displays an amazing collection of geological specimens, chosen specifically to show how our planet works.

Hall of Ocean Life

Hall of Ocean Life

The Milstein Hall of Ocean Life highlights the drama of the undersea world and its diverse and complex web of life in a fully immersive marine environment. The hall is home to one of the Museum’s most celebrated displays—a 94-foot-long, 21,000-pound model of a blue whale suspended from the ceiling.

Hall of Human Origins

Hall of Human Origins

The Anne and Bernard Spitzer Hall of Human Origins pairs fossils with DNA research to present the remarkable history of human evolution. The hall covers millions of years of human history, from early ancestors who lived more than six million years ago to modern Homo sapiens, who evolved 200,000 to 150,000 years ago.

Grand Gallery

Grand Gallery

The Museum has completed a major renovation of the historic 77th Street lobby that restores the grandeur of its original 1904 design and celebrates the preservation and revitalization of a century-old Museum icon—the 63-foot-long Great Canoe.

Hall of Minerals

Hall of Minerals

The Harry Frank Guggenheim Hall of Minerals presents hundreds of striking mineral-bearing specimens collected from around the world, including a giant topaz crystal from Brazil, a 4.5-ton block of azurite-malachite ore from Arizona, and a nephrite jade slab from Poland.

Hall of New York State Environment

Hall of New York State Environment

The Felix M. Warburg Hall of New York State Environment focuses on the village of Pine Plains and Stissing Mountain in New York’s Dutchess County, an area that includes mountains, natural lakes, forests, rock formations, and both wild and cultivated land. 

Hall of Northwest Coast Indians

Hall of Northwest Coast Indians

The Hall of Northwest Coast Indians highlights the traditional cultures of the native peoples of North America’s shores from Washington State to southern Alaska, including the Kwakiutl (known today as Kwakwaka’wakw), Haida, Tlingit, and others.

Hall of North American Forests

Hall of North American Forests

The Hall of North American Forests explores the ecology and variety of the forests of North America—from a northern spruce and fir forest of Ontario to a giant cactus forest in Arizona—in addition to highlighting the forest food web and presenting techniques for protecting forests.

Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals

Hall of North American Mammals

The Hall of North American Mammals features 28 dramatic examples of the large and medium-sized mammals of the North American continent in carefully re-created habitats.

Hall of Small Mammals

Hall of Small Mammals

The Hall of Small Mammals, which is an offshoot of the larger Hall of North American Mammals, depicts a variety of animals in small dioramas of their natural habitats, from the Canadian tundra to the brush country of southern Texas.

Cosmic Pathway

Heilbrunn Cosmic Pathway

The Harriet and Robert Heilbrunn Cosmic Pathway is a 360-foot-long path in the Rose Center for Earth and Space that spirals from the exit of the Hayden Big Bang Theater to the base of the Hayden Sphere, laying out the 13-billion-year history of the universe.

Discovery Room

Discovery Room

The Discovery Room offers families, and especially children ages 5–12, an interactive gateway to the wonders of the Museum and a hands-on, behind-the-scenes look at its science.

Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall_Listing_Sculpture

Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall

The Exhibition Department is renovating, reinterpreting, and updating the first-floor Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall exhibitions for reopening in Fall 2012. 

Hall of Biodiversity

Hall of Biodiversity

The Hall of Biodiversity presents a vivid portrait of the beauty and abundance of life on Earth, highlighting both biodiversity and the factors that threaten it. Ecological biodiversity is illustrated by a 2,500-square-foot walk-through diorama that remakes part of the Dzanga-Sangha rain forest, one of Earth’s most diverse ecosystems.

Hall of Gems

Hall of Gems

The Morgan Memorial Hall of Gems exhibits an array of precious and ornamental stones—uncut, polished, and even a few set in elaborate pieces of jewelry—as well as organic materials such as coral and amber that are prized as gems.

Hall Hall of Meteorites
Hall Hall of Planet Earth
Hall Hall of Ocean Life
Hall Hall of Human Origins
Hall Grand Gallery
Hall Hall of Minerals
Hall Hall of New York State Environment
Hall Hall of Northwest Coast Indians
Hall Hall of North American Forests
Hall Hall of North American Mammals
Hall Hall of Small Mammals
Hall Heilbrunn Cosmic Pathway
Hall Discovery Room
Hall Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals
Hall Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall
Hall Hall of Biodiversity
Hall Hall of Gems
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Hayden Big Bang Theater

Hayden Big Bang Theater

The lower half of the Hayden Sphere is home to the Hayden Big Bang Theater, where visitors can look down into a concave screen to view the Big Bang presentation, a dynamic flight through the virtual universe based on an accurate cosmic atlas mapped using millions of astronomical observations.

Hall of Mexico and Central America

Hall of Mexico and Central America

The Hall of Mexico and Central America features the diverse art, architecture, and traditions of Mesoamerican pre-Columbian cultures through artifacts that span from 1200 BC to the early 1500s.

Sanford Hall of North American Birds

Hall of Birds of the World

The Hall of Birds of the World showcases distinct environments around the world and the birds unique to those locations. Each of the hall’s 12 dioramas depicts a major biome—a region with a particular community of living things, such as a desert or tropical rainforest—along with representative species. 

Hall-of-South-American-Peoples_smalldynamiclead

Hall of South American Peoples

The Hall of South American Peoples features the art, tools, technologies, and traditions of the continent’s pre-Columbian cultures—the ancient Inca, Moche, Chavin, and Chancay—in addition to exhibits about the traditional cultures of modern Amazonia. 

Hall of African Peoples

Hall of African Peoples

The Hall of African Peoples explores Africa's cultural heritage from ancient Egypt to more modern times. The hall highlights lifestyles and customs—many of them disappearing—of peoples living in four environments: grasslands, deserts, forests, and river regions.

Gardner-D.-Stout-Hall-of-Asian-Peoples_smalldynamiclead

Hall of Asian Peoples

The Gardner D. Stout Hall of Asian Peoples—the Museum’s largest cultural hall—showcases some of the finest collections in Asian ethnology in the Western Hemisphere. Some 3,000 artifacts, which represent about 5 percent of the Museum’s considerable holdings, are displayed in the hall.

Akeley Hall of African Mammals

Hall of African Mammals

The Akeley Hall of African Mammals showcases large mammals of Africa. At the center is a freestanding group of eight elephants, poised as if to charge, surrounded by 28 habitat dioramas.

Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda

Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda

The Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda is New York's official memorial to the 26th President of the United States. In addition to leading expeditions for the Museum, Roosevelt championed environmental conservation.

Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda

Hall of Oceanic Birds

This hall's dioramas represent the bird life of the far-flung islands of the Pacific. These islands are geologically diverse, ranging from low coral to high mountains. One of the dioramas represents the bird population of the Guano Islands, named after the birds excretion, or guano, that coats the islands rocks.

Scales of the Universe

Scales of the Universe

Displayed along the 400-foot-long walkway that hugs the glass curtain wall on the second level of the Rose Center for Earth and Space, the Scales of the Universe vividly illustrates the vast range of sizes in the universe, from subatomic particles and objects on the human scale to the largest objects in the observable cosmos.

Cosmic Pathway

Cosmic Pathway

The Harriet and Robert Heilbrunn Cosmic Pathway is a 360-foot-long path in the Rose Center for Earth and Space that spirals from the exit of the Hayden Big Bang Theater to the base of the Hayden Sphere, laying out the 13-billion-year history of the universe.

Hayden Planetarium

Hayden Planetarium

At the heart of the Rose Center for Earth and Space is an 87-foot-diameter sphere that appears to float inside a glass cube. Its upper half constitutes the Hayden Planetarium, which opened in 2000 along with the Rose Center for Earth and Space. It remains an enduring beacon of astrophysical education, as was its predecessor, which opened in 1935.

Hall of Asian Mammals

Hall of Asian Mammals

Between 1922 and 1928, Museum Trustee Arthur S. Vernay and British Colonel John C. Faunthorpe conducted six expeditions to collect animal specimens in India, Burma (now Myanmar), and Siam (now Thailand). The specimens were then donated to the Museum and formed the foundation for the Hall of Asian Mammals, which opened in 1930.

Hall Hayden Big Bang Theater
Hall Hall of Mexico and Central America
Hall Hall of Birds of the World
Hall Hall of South American Peoples
Hall Hall of African Peoples
Hall Hall of Asian Peoples
Hall Hall of African Mammals
Hall Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda
Hall Hall of Oceanic Birds
Hall Scales of the Universe
Hall Cosmic Pathway
Hall Hayden Planetarium
Hall Hall of Asian Mammals
floor-3rd-level
Hall of Pacific Peoples

Hall of Pacific Peoples

Anthropologist and longtime Museum curator Margaret Mead provided the foundation for the hall that bears her name through her groundbreaking expeditions to Samoa, New Guinea, and Bali.

Hall of Eastern Woodland Indians

Hall of Eastern Woodlands Indians

The Hall of Eastern Woodland Indians focuses on the traditional cultures of the Native American peoples living in the Eastern Woodlands of North America, including the Iroquois, Mohegan, Ojibwa, and Cree, through the early 20th century.

Hall of Primates

Hall of Primates

The Hall of Primates explores the mammalian order that includes apes, monkeys, and humans. Primates range in size from the pygmy marmoset to the gorilla, and include species that feed on insects, fruit, leaves, and sap.

Hall of North American Birds

Hall of North American Birds

The Leonard C. Sanford Hall of North American Birds features more than 20 dioramas that depict bird species in habitats ranging from the Florida Everglades to Alaskan riverbeds, with forest, prairie, marsh, and desert among the ecosystems represented.

Hall of New York State Mammals

Hall of New York State Mammals

The Hall of New York State Mammals introduces visitors to the diversity of local wildlife. Arranged in cased displays of discrete specimens, the hall presents a range of more than 50 land mammals—from shrews to bats, beavers to bobcats—and invites comparisons of their distinctive external features, such as fur, claws, ears, body shape, and size.

Hall of New York City Birds

Hall of New York City Birds

The Hall of New York City Birds showcases the rich diversity of birds in the greater New York area. The region attracts more than 400 species of birds because of its varied habitats—which include ponds and lakes, marshes and seashore, open meadows and wooded sections—and due to its location along major bird migratory routes.

Akeley Hall of African Mammals

Hall of African Mammals

The Akeley Hall of African Mammals showcases large mammals of Africa. At the center is a freestanding group of eight elephants, poised as if to charge, surrounded by 28 habitat dioramas.

Hall of Reptiles and Amphibians

Hall of Reptiles and Amphibians

The Hall of Reptiles and Amphibians explores the anatomy, defense, locomotion, distribution, reproduction, and feeding habits of reptiles and amphibians.

Hall of Plains Indians

Hall of Plains Indians

The Hall of Plains Indians focuses on the life of 19th-century Hidatsa, Dakota (Sioux), Cheyenne, Arapaho, Crow, and other Native American peoples of the North American Plains.

Hall of Plains Indians

Hayden Planetarium

At the heart of the Rose Center for Earth and Space is an 87-foot-diameter sphere that appears to float inside a glass cube. Its upper half constitutes the Hayden Planetarium, which opened in 2000 along with the Rose Center for Earth and Space.

Our Global Kitchen Pattern 1 Detail

Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture

Take a journey around the world and through time. Stroll through an ancient market, cook a virtual meal, peek inside the dining rooms of illustrious individuals—and consider some of the most challenging issues of our time. 

Hall Hall of Pacific Peoples
Hall Hall of Eastern Woodlands Indians
Hall Hall of Primates
Hall Hall of North American Birds
Hall Hall of New York State Mammals
Hall Hall of New York City Birds
Hall Hall of African Mammals
Hall Hall of Reptiles and Amphibians
Hall Hall of Plains Indians
Hall Hayden Planetarium
floor-4th-level-2
Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Orientation Center

Miriam and Ida D. Wallach Orientation Center

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Orientation Center introduces visitors to the key concepts presented in the Museum’s fourth floor fossil halls.

Hall of Vertebrate Origins

Hall of Vertebrate Origins

The Hall of Vertebrate Origins traces the evolution of vertebrates, or animals with backbones, back more than 500 million years.

Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs

Saurischian Dinosaurs

One of two halls in the David H. Koch Dinosaur Wing, the Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs features fossils from one of two major groups of dinosaurs. Saurischians are characterized by grasping hands, in which the thumb is offset from the other fingers. This hall features the imposing mounts of Tyrannosaurus rex andApatosaurus.

Hall of Advanced Mammals

Milstein Hall of Advanced Mammals

The Paul and Irma Milstein Hall of Advanced Mammals is one of two halls in the Lila Acheson Wallace Wing of Mammals and Their Extinct Relatives, which together tell of the great diversification and sudden extinctions of this group of animals.

Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs

Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs

One of two halls in the David H. Koch Dinosaur Wing, the Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs features fossils from one of two major groups of dinosaurs.

Hall of Primitive Mammals

Hall of Primitive Mammals

The Hall of Primitive Mammals, one of two halls in the Lila Acheson Wallace Wing of Mammals and Their Extinct Relatives, traces the lower branches of the evolutionary tree of mammals, including monotremes, marsupials, sloths, and armadillos.

American Museum of Natural History

Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192
Phone: 212-769-5100

Open daily from 10 am - 5:45 pm
except on Thanksgiving and Christmas
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