How to Talk About Climate Change to Your Friends and Family main content.

How to Talk About Climate Change to Your Friends and Family

Part of Events for Adults

Thursday, September 26, 2019

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What do family, friends, and others in our community think about climate change?

Our assumptions may be based on snap judgments about people’s perceptions of this crisis based on our personal, political, and social biases. To effectively speak about climate change with others, we must understand the science behind it, perceptions of the key issues, and willingness to act on information. Join Jennifer Marlon and Anthony Leiserowitz from the Yale Program for Climate Change Communication for a discussion about perceptions of climate change across the nation and to learn how to become better climate change communicators.

Meet the Speakers

Anthony Leiserowitz's headshot

Anthony Leiserowitz, Ph.D. is Director of the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication and a Senior Research Scientist at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. He is an expert on public environmental beliefs, attitudes, policy preferences, and behavior, and the psychological, cultural, and political factors that influence them. He conducts research at the global, national, and local scales, including many studies of the American public. He also conducted the first global study of public values, attitudes, and behaviors regarding sustainable development and has published more than 200 scientific articles, chapters, and reports. He has served as a consultant to the John F. Kennedy School of Government (Harvard University), the United Nations Development Program, the Gallup World Poll, and the World Economic Forum. He is a recipient of the Friend of the Planet Award from the National Center for Science Education and a Mitofsky Innovator Award from the American Association of Public Opinion Research. He is also the host of Climate Connections, a daily radio program broadcast on more than 500 stations and frequencies nationwide. Twitter: @ecotone2

Jennifer Marlon's headshot

Jennifer Marlon, Ph.D. is a Research Scientist at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication. Her research connects the physical and social dimensions of climate change, particularly in relation to extreme weather. She conducts research on the causes and impacts of wildfires, heatwaves, hurricanes, and drought. She uses ecological and climate data along with surveys, experiments, and modeling to study how climate change affects extreme events, and how people perceive and respond to these events. She teaches classes in Environmental Data Science, and Environmental Data Visualization and Communication. Jennifer holds a PhD and MS in Geography from the University of Oregon, and a BS from the University at Albany, State University of New York. She has published over 40 peer-reviewed articles in journals such as Nature Climate Change, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Political Science Research Methods, Journal of Risk Research, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, and Nature Geoscience. Twitter: @mudfire