For Educators

Climate Change: The Threat to Life and A New Energy Future explores how climate works, why it is warming, what the consequences might be, and how to address them. This comprehensive guide will help you explore the exhibition with your students. 

Educators Guide for Materials


More Resources for Educators

Use these free online resources before or after your visit to further explore themes presented in the Climate Change exhibition.

Planet Disaster? (SuperScience)

Article

Planet Disaster? (SuperScience)

The world's climate is changing. Scientists say the effects of these changes could be devastating to living things on Earth—including humans. See what scientists are doing now, and learn ways to help.

Warming Signs (Science World)

Article

Warming Signs (Science World)

Earth's climate is changing, and according to scientists today's kids will bear the brunt of the potentially damaging affects of a warmer world. Find out how scientists are preparing now for the potential negative consequences.

What's the Big Idea About Climate Change?

What's the Big Idea About Climate Change?

This isn't the first time Earth's climate has changed, but it's the first time human activity has caused it. Learn more about global warming and how — and why — we should slow it. 

Carbon Dioxide Removal

Activity

Carbon Dioxide Removal

Students in grades 3-8 can observe and learn about the carbon cycle in this experiment.

Climate Change Circle of Consequences

Activity

Climate Change Circle of Consequences

"Greenhouse effect" and "global warming" are becoming household phrases but how, exactly, are they linked? Explore the interconnections and consequences of climate change.

Environmental Alphabet

Activity

Environmental Alphabet

"Atmosphere," "biofuels," "carbon dioxide"—challenge students to spell out their climate change knowledge from A to Z.

Using Solar Energy

Activity

Using Solar Energy

After having students conduct a simple solar energy experiment, challenge them to build a better water heater with this classroom competition.

Messenger: Mission to Mercury

Science Bulletin

MESSENGER: Mission to Mercury

The MESSENGER orbiter's January 2008 flyby of the planet Mercury was historic. The last time a spacecraft visited was 1975, and it only mapped half the planet. MESSENGER is now sending back a complete picture of Mercury, shedding light on its geological history. But the ongoing mission will return much more than images. Its data on the planet's core, magnetic field, composition, and other attributes will help scientists answer pressing questions about the evolution of the terrestrial planets and even the Solar System itself. In the feature video, watch the MESSENGER science team react as the orbiter's first images of Mercury roll in. To explore the images in detail, click on the slide show at left. Find out more on the mission by clicking on the essay "First Planet Finishes Last."

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