November 28–30: Volcanoes, Pterosaurs, and Lonesome George This Thanksgiving Weekend main content.

November 28–30: Volcanoes, Pterosaurs, and Lonesome George This Thanksgiving Weekend

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This Thanksgiving weekend, bring your family to the Museum to learn about how nature’s forces shape our dynamic planet, to discover incredible flying reptiles that lived more than 200 million years ago, and to see Lonesome George, the last known Pinta Island tortoise. 

What is an active volcano?

Not necessarily one that’s erupting. Watch the video about the magma chamber below Yellowstone National Park to find out, and learn more in the new exhibition Nature’s Fury the Science of Natural Disasters

Yellowstone - Monitoring the Fire Below

Yellowstone - Monitoring the Fire Below

How did pterosaurs fly?

Pterosaurs were the first animals after insects to evolve powered flight. Find out about their unique adaptation in the video below, and see pterosaurs of all shapes and sizes in the Museum’s exhibition Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of the Dinosaurs. 

How Were Pterosaurs Adapted for Flight?

How Were Pterosaurs Adapted for Flight?

What are the basics steps of taxidermy?

After the Pinta Island tortoise Lonesome George, the last known member of his species, died of natural causes in June 2012, Museum scientists worked with taxidermy experts to preserve Lonesome George. Watch the video to learn about the ten steps of taxidermy, and see Lonesome George on the Museum’s fourth floor. 

Ten Steps of Tortoise Taxidermy

Ten Steps of Tortoise Taxidermy