Solomon Islands: Guadalcanal

The CBC successfully completed a groundbreaking expedition to the Guadalcanal highlands in the Solomon Islands, led by Pacific Programs Director Dr. Chris Filardi, in partnership with Uluna-Sutahuri tribal leadership, the Solomon Islands Community Conservation Partnership, and the University of the South Pacific.

The expedition described unique biodiversity, including a number of previously undescribed and poorly known species, while assisting the ancestral landholders, the Uluna-Sutahari tribe, in their efforts to gain protection for this area as sacred customary land. The expedition has been catalytic in terms of policy as the Prime Minister’s Office, local leaders, and the Uluna-Sutahuri tribe formally agreed that this area should advance toward national recognition under the recently passed Protected Areas Act.

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Before the expedition, the research team formally presented the Uluna-Sutahuri tribe, which has land rights over Mt. Popomanaseu, with food and gifts.


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This frog was discovered by its odd barking calls in the night, and may be an undescribed species.


Building on the success of this expedition, a second one with CBC and other AMNH scientists along with local experts will continue to document the thriving biodiversity of this area, further studying little known species and recording unique soundscapes in this remote forest. We are exploring working with Google Cardboard Expeditions, a teaching tool that uses a simple gadget made out of a few pieces cardboard, a couple of lenses, and a smartphone to take schoolchildren on virtual reality field trips.

Read more about the CBC's research and conservation work in the Solomon Islands