Whiteley, Peter main content.

Peter Whiteley

Peter Whiteley

Curator of North American Ethnology, Division of Anthropology
Professor, Richard Gilder Graduate School

Phone:
212-496-3496
Fax:
212-769-5334

Education

  • University of New Mexico, Ph.D., 1982
  • University of New Mexico, M.A., 1978
  • Cambridge University, B.A., 1975

Research Interests

Dr. Peter Whiteley studies Native North American cultures ethnographically and historically. His main focus is the Hopi of northern Arizona, where he began fieldwork in 1980, resulting in four books and monographs: Deliberate Acts: Changing Hopi Culture through the Oraibi Split (University of Arizona Press, 1988), Bacavi: Journey to Reed Springs (Northland Press, 1988), Rethinking Hopi Ethnography (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1998), and The Orayvi Split: a Hopi Transformation (Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History, 2008). In 2005, his paper Bartering Pahos with the President, on a Hopi diplomatic gift, won the Robert F. Heizer Prize for “best article in the field of ethnohistory.” Current Hopi work includes a collaborative project (funded by the National Science Foundation’s Endangered Languages program) on Hopi place-names and landscape concepts, with the Hopi Office of Cultural Preservation and colleagues at the University of Arizona.

Whiteley has also worked with the Cayuga and Akwesasne Mohawk in upstate New York, and is preparing a history of the Cayuga in the aftermath of the Revolutionary War. Other field and archival research includes the Rio Grande Pueblos, the Hupa of northwestern California, Coast Salish of western Washington, and the Choctaw and Chickasaw of Oklahoma and Mississippi. Since 2009, Whiteley has led a comparative inquiry into Crow-Omaha kinship systems, both in Native North America and globally, with AMNH colleague Ward Wheeler (curator of Invertebrate Zoology), funded by the National Science Foundation’s Anthropology Program. One result is Crow-Omaha: New Light on a Classic Problem of Kinship Analysis (University of Arizona Press, 2012), a volume co-edited by Whiteley and Thomas Trautmann of the University of Michigan. Whiteley and Wheeler have also initiated a joint study (using phylogenetic methods) of how languages evolve, concentrating on the Uto-Aztecan languages of North and Middle America.

Publications

(selected recent & major publications)

2012 (Ward C. Wheeler, Peter M. Whiteley, and Theodore Powers) Phylogenetic Analysis of Socio-Cultural Data: Identifying Transformation Vectors for Kinship Systems. In Crow-Omaha: New Light on a Classic Problem of Kinship Analysis, Thomas R. Trautmann and Peter M. Whiteley, eds., pp. 109-31. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

2012 Crow-Omaha Kinship in North America: A Puebloan Perspective. In Crow-Omaha: New Light on a Classic Problem of Kinship Analysis, Thomas R. Trautmann and Peter M. Whiteley, eds., pp. 83-108. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.
 
2011 Who Were the Napac? Decoding an Ethnohistorical Enigma. Kiva: The Journal of Southwestern Anthropology and History 77:1:59-86.

2011 Hopi Place Value: Translating a Landscape. In Born in the Blood: On Native American Translation, Brian Swann, ed., pp. 84-108. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

2008 The Orayvi Split: A Hopi Transformation. Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History 87. 2 vols.

2008 Explanation vs. Sensation: the Discourse of Cannibalism at Awat’ovi. In Social Violence in the Prehispanic American Southwest, Deborah Nichols and Patricia Crown, eds., pp. 184-215. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

2004 Bartering Pahos with the President. Ethnohistory 51:2:359-414.

2003 Do "Language Rights" Serve Indigenous Interests? Some Hopi and Other Queries. American Anthropologist 105:4:712-722.

1998 Rethinking Hopi Ethnography. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.

1988 Deliberate Acts: Changing Hopi Culture through the Oraibi Split. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Complete List of Peter Whiteley's Recent Publications

Teaching Experience

Faculty Appointments
 Adjunct Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University, 2001-present

 Affiliated Professor, Ph.D. Program in Anthropology, CUNY, 2001-present

 Professor of Anthropology, Sarah Lawrence College, 1985-2000

 Adjunct Professor, Department of Anthropology, Northern Arizona University, 1983-85

Courses Taught

 Ritual and Symbolism

 American Indian History

 Ethnography and Literature
 
 Structuralism
 
 Anthropological Theory
 
 Political Anthropology
 
 Museum Anthropology
 
 Border Theory

Post-doctoral advisees
 Aaron Glass, AMNH/Bard Graduate Center Postdoctoral fellow, 2008-10

Doctoral Committees
 Caroline Heitman, University of Virginia, 2011

 Johanna Gorelick, C.U.N.Y. Graduate Center Doctoral Program in Anthropology, 2005

 Susan Golla, Columbia University, 1987

Master’s Committees
 Catherine McLaughlin, Columbia University, 2007

Graduate Student Research Assistants
 Theodore Powers, C.U.N.Y. Graduate Center (funded by NSF), 2009-2011

 Nathan Woods, C.U.N.Y. Graduate Center (funded by NSF), 2010-2012

 Tina Brüderlin, Johannes Gutenberg University (funded by Eugene V. and Clare Thaw Charitable Trust), 2008

 William Peace, Columbia University (funded by AMNH start-up grant), 2001-2003

External Links