Almécija, Sergio main content.

Sergio Almécija

Sergio_Almecija_photo

Senior Research Scientist, Biological Anthropology

Phone:
212-769-5741

Research Interests

Dr. Sergio Almécija is a biological anthropologist, evolutionary morphologist and paleontologist studying the key adaptations defining different stages of ape and human evolution. He is interested in the original selective pressures responsible for specific evolutionary transitions, such as the split between the lineages leading to chimpanzees and humans. Living apes and humans constitute a relict of a once highly diversified group. During the Miocene (23 Ma to 5.3 Ma) in Africa, Europe and Asia there was a greater diversity of apes that did not resemble or move around like any primates alive today. Because of this, current debates in paleoanthropology focus on elucidating the functional morphology and shape affinities of these fossil forms. It is from some of these Miocene apes that both modern great apes and earliest hominins (earliest ancestors of the human family) evolved. Thus, only by studying the evolution of apes and their environment in combination with available early hominins we will be able to provide realistic models of ape and human evolution and thus understand human origins.

Dr. Almécija's research seeks to address these issues through several major avenues of investigation:

​(1) Paleontological field work to recover new fossil apes and humans
(2) Novel and traditional morphometric techniques to quantitatively characterize primate morphologies
(3) Phylogenetic comparative methods and evolutionary modeling to elucidate the tempo and mode of ape and human evolution
(4) Implementing biological data form living primates (e.g,. locomotor behavior, molecular phylogenetics) in paleobiological inferences

 

Publications

Recent Publications
2018. Alba D.M., S. Moyà-Solà, D. DeMiguel, I. Casanovas-Vilar, M. Garcés, J.M. Robles, J. Madurell-Malapeira, and S. Almécija. Ape quest in the Vallès-Penedès Basin (2014–2017): Fieldwork results and prospects for the future. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 165 (S66): 7.

2018. Boyle, E.K., and S. Almécija. Iliac flare is related to body mass and gut size in apes, but not in monkeys. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 165 (S66):34–35.

2018. Fatica, L.M., A.S. Hammond, S.C. McFarlin, and S. Almécija. Morphological variation in the pelvis of gorilla subspecies may not track ecomorphological predictions. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 165 (S66): 82.

2018. Ostrofsky, K.R., N. Thompson, S.C. Mcfarlin, M.M. Robbins, T.S. Stoinski, and S. Almécija. Capturing 3-D locomotor kinematics in wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei). American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 165 (S66):195.

2018. Peña, A., B.A. Patel, C.M. Orr, and S. Almécija. Patterns of integration in the hominoid skeleton: a case-study on the wrist. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 165 (S66): 203.

2018. Průcha, A.D., and S. Almécija. Sensitivity analysis of semilandmark sliding method and evolutionary model choice in ancestral state reconstructions: The hominoid facial skeleton as a test case. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 165 (S66): 214–215.

2018. Thompson N.E, K.R. Ostrofsky, S.C. McFarlin, M.M. Robbins, T.S. Stoinski, and S. Almécija. Unexpected terrestrial hand posture diversity in wild mountain gorillas. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 166:84–94.

2018. Thompson, N.E., K.R. Ostrofsky, S.C. Mcfarlin, M.M. Robbins, D. Rubinstein, and S. Almécija. Preliminary 3-D kinematic data of wild mountain gorilla terrestrial locomotion: using lab-based methods in ape environments. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 165 (S66): 274.

2018. Urciuoli, A, C. Zanolli, J. Fortuny, S. Almécija, B. Schillinger, S. Moyà-Solà, and D.M. Alba.Neutron-based computed microtomography: Pliobates cataloniae and Barberapithecus huerzeleri as a test-case study. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 166: 987–993.

2018. Wawrzyniak, D.C., and S. Almécija. The evolution of body size in the diverse lesser apes. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 165 (S66): 296–297.

2017. Thompson, N.E., and S. Almécija. The evolution of vertebral formulae in Hominoidea. Journal of Human Evolution 110: 18–36.

2017. Villa, A., M. Delfino, À.H. Luján, S. Almécija, and D.M. Alba. First record of Latonia gigantea (Anura, Alytidae) from the Iberian Peninsula. Historical Biology. [DOI:10.1080/08912963.2017.1371712]

External Links