Post-Secondary

Degree Program
Richard Gilder Graduate School
Ph.D. in Comparative Biology
Taking full advantage of the Museum’s unparalleled resources, this Ph.D. program - the first for any museum in the Western Hemisphere - has graduated doctoral students who have gone on to careers in academia, museum curation, government, industry, and the private sector.

 

Degree Program
Richard Gilder Graduate School
Master of Arts in Teaching
Learn to teach Earth and Space science in New York City through the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Urban Residency Program at the American Museum of Natural History; the first urban teacher residency program offered by a museum.




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Science Bulletin

Urban Sprawl: Phoenix

Most people think of urban sprawl as the construction of roads and buildings at a rate that exceeds population growth. Phoenix, Arizona, however, offers a contrasting model of sprawl. Its metropolitan area has grown more than 300 percent in recent decades, but its population has grown even faster. Since the mid-1980's, the city's population density has increased as people continue to move to the region even as the urban area's boundaries have grown more slowly. This trend is by necessity, since the water supply cannot feed an ever-expanding metropolitan area.

Essay: Stars in Exquisite Accuracy

Essay

Essay: Stars in Exquisite Accuracy

There’s only one star that astronomers have a firm grasp on: the Sun. Fundamental facts about other stars remain elusive. Find out how a powerful interferometer atop Mount Wilson in Southern California hopes to change that.

Article: The Horse in Mongolian Culture

Article

Article: The Horse in Mongolian Culture

Take a look at Mongolia's takhi and discover how an Asian empire was won on horseback — and how Mongolia came to be known as the land of the horse. 

Essay: Chasing Invaders on a Water Planet

Science Bulletins, Essay

Essay: Chasing Invaders on a Water Planet

Water bodies on our planet form a network, which aquatic species migrate over evolutionary time as needed or by accident. Find out how Homo sapiens have dramatically changed and accelerated this process.

From Goo to Zoo

Article

From Goo to Zoo

Meet a deep-sea ecologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute who has pioneered the use of submersible robots to study jellyfish and other gelatinous invertebrates in their native deep-sea environment.

Shaping a Continent: Version 1.0

Article

Shaping a Continent: Version 1.0

Discover how scientists are now marrying traditional fieldwork with cutting-edge computer modeling to produce the first animated, theoretical picture of the Basin and Range Province's geological evolution.

Article: Follow the Magma

Article

Article: Follow the Magma

In 1669, the fastest and largest lava flow documented for Mount Etna on the island of Sicily killed most of Catania's 20,000 residents and destroyed much of the city. Why are scientists now watching Etna more than any other volcano in Europe? Find out.

The Ice Plant Cometh

Article

The Ice Plant Cometh

During a July 2004 project to drill an ice core from the top of Peru's Andes Mountain, the lead researcher took a detour… and made a discovery with profound implications. Learn more.

Expedition for an Ice Core

Article

Expedition for an Ice Core

By analyzing the relics glaciers hold — compacted snow and trapped air from ancient atmospheres, ash from long-quiet volcanoes, dust, insects, and pollen — scientists can reconstruct hundreds of thousands of years of Earth’s climate.

The Coming and Going of an Ice Age

Article

The Coming and Going of an Ice Age

In the past two million years alone, Earth has experienced around 20 ice ages — cycles of advance and retreat of large continental ice sheets. When is the next one due? And will global warming change that due date?

Rapid Change in a Warming World

Article

Rapid Change in a Warming World

Climate change isn’t always slow, small, and imperceptible in a human lifetime. Ice core analysis has found a single decade in which temperatures over Greenland shot up about 15 degrees Celsius.

The Climate Jump Heard 'Round The World

Article

The Climate Jump Heard 'Round The World

Scientists know that the unusual and rapid temperature jump of the Younger Dryas was felt over half the globe. But they're only now beginning to understand why.

NAO Who?

Article

NAO Who?

Name any debacle of nature, and someone will likely blame it on El Niño. But there’s another large-scale climate pattern that's been overlooked: El Niño's fickle Nordic sister, the North Atlantic Oscillation.

How NAO Does Its Thing

Article

How NAO Does Its Thing

Find out how each NAO phase spins its particular brand of atmospheric tumult, affecting temperature, precipitation, cloudiness, and windiness in different regions — sometimes to drastic ends.

NAO Data Hunting (and Gathering)

Article

NAO Data Hunting (and Gathering)

From the chilly depths of the Atlantic to ancient European forests, researchers are combing for data to explain the NAO's mysteries.

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