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Post-Secondary

Degree Program
Richard Gilder Graduate School
Ph.D. in Comparative Biology
Taking full advantage of the Museum’s unparalleled resources, this Ph.D. program - the first for any museum in the Western Hemisphere - has graduated doctoral students who have gone on to careers in academia, museum curation, government, industry, and the private sector.

 

Degree Program
Richard Gilder Graduate School
Master of Arts in Teaching
Learn to teach Earth and Space science in New York City through the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Urban Residency Program at the American Museum of Natural History; the first urban teacher residency program offered by a museum.




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Science Bulletin

Urban Sprawl: Phoenix

Most people think of urban sprawl as the construction of roads and buildings at a rate that exceeds population growth. Phoenix, Arizona, however, offers a contrasting model of sprawl. Its metropolitan area has grown more than 300 percent in recent decades, but its population has grown even faster. Since the mid-1980's, the city's population density has increased as people continue to move to the region even as the urban area's boundaries have grown more slowly. This trend is by necessity, since the water supply cannot feed an ever-expanding metropolitan area.

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The Sorry Story of Georges Bank

Find out why this huge shoal between Massachusetts' Cape Cod and Nova Scotia's Cape Sable Island is one of the world's most important fishing resources — and why it's now at risk.

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Science Stays Alert, Part I: Birds Under Scrutiny

In a handful of cases, humans have contracted H5N1 from birds and then passed the virus to other humans. Even so, doctors and scientists are taking great pains to prepare for the possibility of such a pandemic.

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The Enigma of High Energy Cosmic Rays

In 1912, Viktor Hess took to the sky in a hot-air balloon and discovered a radioactive energy now called “cosmic rays.” Travel to Argentina to see how scientists now hope to discover at long last where the highest-energy cosmic rays are coming from.

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Article: The Horse in Mongolian Culture

Take a look at Mongolia's takhi and discover how an Asian empire was won on horseback — and how Mongolia came to be known as the land of the horse. 

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Biogeography Begets Biodiversity

Discover how the geological and climatic changes that have unfolded over millions of years in Vietnam have set the stage for an extraordinary richness of biodiversity.

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Biodiversity in the Crossfire

See how scientists are racing to reveal Vietnam's biological riches before many species and their habitats disappear from the country's landscape due to expanding development and human activity.

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Article: An Ode to O

Where would the world be without oxygen? While it's hard to imagine an Earth without it, for nearly the first half of the planet's 4.5-billion-year history, Earth had no oxygen gas as part of its atmosphere.

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Article: Earth Without Oxygen

Where would the world be without oxygen? While it's hard to imagine an Earth without it, for nearly the first half of the planet's 4.5-billion-year history, Earth had no oxygen gas as part of its atmosphere.

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Article: Life Makes a Mark

One of the biggest forces that's shaped planet Earth over time is microscopic in size. Explore the global impact of microbes.

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Phone: 212-769-5100

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