Post-Secondary

Degree Program
Richard Gilder Graduate School
Ph.D. in Comparative Biology
Taking full advantage of the Museum’s unparalleled resources, this Ph.D. program - the first for any museum in the Western Hemisphere - has graduated doctoral students who have gone on to careers in academia, museum curation, government, industry, and the private sector.

 

Degree Program
Richard Gilder Graduate School
Master of Arts in Teaching
Learn to teach Earth and Space science in New York City through the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Urban Residency Program at the American Museum of Natural History; the first urban teacher residency program offered by a museum.




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Science Bulletin

Urban Sprawl: Phoenix

Most people think of urban sprawl as the construction of roads and buildings at a rate that exceeds population growth. Phoenix, Arizona, however, offers a contrasting model of sprawl. Its metropolitan area has grown more than 300 percent in recent decades, but its population has grown even faster. Since the mid-1980's, the city's population density has increased as people continue to move to the region even as the urban area's boundaries have grown more slowly. This trend is by necessity, since the water supply cannot feed an ever-expanding metropolitan area.

Biogeography Begets Biodiversity

Article

Biogeography Begets Biodiversity

Discover how the geological and climatic changes that have unfolded over millions of years in Vietnam have set the stage for an extraordinary richness of biodiversity.

Biodiversity in the Crossfire

Article

Biodiversity in the Crossfire

See how scientists are racing to reveal Vietnam's biological riches before many species and their habitats disappear from the country's landscape due to expanding development and human activity.

Article

The Sorry Story of Georges Bank

Find out why this huge shoal between Massachusetts' Cape Cod and Nova Scotia's Cape Sable Island is one of the world's most important fishing resources — and why it's now at risk.

Article: The Horse in Mongolian Culture

Article

Article: The Horse in Mongolian Culture

Take a look at Mongolia's takhi and discover how an Asian empire was won on horseback — and how Mongolia came to be known as the land of the horse. 

Essay: Chasing Invaders on a Water Planet

Science Bulletins, Essay

Essay: Chasing Invaders on a Water Planet

Water bodies on our planet form a network, which aquatic species migrate over evolutionary time as needed or by accident. Find out how Homo sapiens have dramatically changed and accelerated this process.

From Goo to Zoo

Article

From Goo to Zoo

Meet a deep-sea ecologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute who has pioneered the use of submersible robots to study jellyfish and other gelatinous invertebrates in their native deep-sea environment.

Why Mangroves Matter

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Why Mangroves Matter

Learn more about these forests, once generally dismissed as swampy wastelands but now valued as remarkably diverse and important ecosystems.

What's a Mangrove? And How Does It Work?

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What's a Mangrove? And How Does It Work?

Investigate this remarkably tough plant that can live in water up to 100 times saltier than most other plants can tolerate, not to mention thrive despite twice-daily flooding by ocean tides.

Mangrove Threats and Solutions

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Mangrove Threats and Solutions

Straddling land and sea and teeming with life, mangrove forests are key to healthy coastal ecosystems. They're also among the most threatened habitats in the world. Learn more.

Article: GRACE Watches Earth's Water

Article

Article: GRACE Watches Earth's Water

Earth's water is in constant motion. It cycles through the planet's atmosphere, surface, and depths. This water cycle is fundamental to Earth’s climate — and is being dramatically affected by global warming.

Shaping a Continent: Version 1.0

Article

Shaping a Continent: Version 1.0

Discover how scientists are now marrying traditional fieldwork with cutting-edge computer modeling to produce the first animated, theoretical picture of the Basin and Range Province's geological evolution.

Article: Follow the Magma

Article

Article: Follow the Magma

In 1669, the fastest and largest lava flow documented for Mount Etna on the island of Sicily killed most of Catania's 20,000 residents and destroyed much of the city. Why are scientists now watching Etna more than any other volcano in Europe? Find out.

The Ice Plant Cometh

Article

The Ice Plant Cometh

During a July 2004 project to drill an ice core from the top of Peru's Andes Mountain, the lead researcher took a detour… and made a discovery with profound implications. Learn more.

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