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Theodore Roosevelt Tour

Explore connections to the Conservation President at the American Museum of Natural History on this free self-guided tour.

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Roosevelt Family

This hall, the Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda above, and the Central Park West entrance opened in 1936 as New York State’s official memorial to Theodore Roosevelt, Governor of New York (1899-1901) and 26th President of the United States (1901–1909).

Floor: 1st Floor | Exhibit Hall: Theodore Roosevelt Memorial

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History Of The Memorial

On Oct. 27, 1931, Roosevelt’s fifth cousin Franklin D. Roosevelt, then Governor of New York, laid the cornerstone of the two-story Memorial.

Floor: 1st Floor | Exhibit Hall: Theodore Roosevelt Memorial

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Roosevelt Sculpture

This depiction of Theodore Roosevelt as he looked during a 1903 trip to Yosemite with fellow naturalist John Muir is the starting point for an exploration of Roosevelt’s life.

Floor: 1st Floor | Exhibit Hall: Theodore Roosevelt Memorial

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Theodore Roosevelt Tour: Conservation President

Many of the dioramas in this hall powerfully represent Theodore Roosevelt’s conservation legacy. “We are not building this country of ours for a day,” he said. “It is to last through the ages.”

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Theodore Roosevelt Tour: American Bison and Pronghorn

As president, Theodore Roosevelt created Montana’s National Bison Range and Oklahoma’s Wichita Game Preserve in which bison were released. This and subsequent efforts brought the bison back from the brink of extinction.

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Theodore Roosevelt Tour: Alaska Brown Bear

Theodore Roosevelt was the inspiration for the teddy bear. The popularity of a new stuffed bear toy in the early 1900s coincided with a political cartoonist's publicizing a famous presidential bear hunt. 

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Theodore Roosevelt Tour: Coyote

In May, 1903, Theodore Roosevelt and naturalist John Muir camped for three nights in Yosemite Valley, California, depicted here. It was the beginning of a friendship and frequent collaboration in the cause of conservation. 

Endangered Species
Endangered Species Case

In a letter to Museum ornithologist Frank Chapman in 1899, Theodore Roosevelt wrote, "When I hear of the destruction of a species I feel just as if all the works of some great writer had perished."

Floor: 1st Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Biodiversity

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Giant Mosquito (Anopheles maculipennis)

In 1917, the Museum displayed this huge model to educate the public about malaria and yellow fever. While president, Theodore Roosevelt played a key role in ending epidemics by lending his support to the then-controversial idea that the mosquito, not poor sanitation, spread the deadly diseases.

Floor: 1st Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of North American Forests

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The Big Tree or Giant Sequoia (Sequoia gigante)

Throughout his life, Theodore Roosevelt treasured America's forests. "A grove of giant redwood or sequoias should be kept just as we keep a great and beautiful cathedral," he once wrote.

Floor: 1st Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of North American Forests

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John Burroughs

This corridor celebrates nature writer John Burroughs (1837-1921). Among the mementos is a photograph of President Theodore Roosevelt and First Lady Edith Roosevelt on a 1903 visit to Slabsides, Burroughs' rustic cabin in New York. 

Floor: 1st Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of Northwest Coast Indians

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Roosevelt Collections

The early peoples of South America may have hunted a giant ground sloth, Mylodon darwinii, that became extinct 10,000 years ago. Its skin and dung, displayed here, were a gift from President Theodore Roosevelt.

Floor: 2nd Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of South American Peoples

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Wading Birds Diorama

Museum ornithologist Frank Chapman used habitat dioramas to call attention to the plight of endangered birds. In 1903, he persuaded President Theodore Roosevelt to establish the first Federal Bird Reserve, on Florida’s Pelican Island.

Floor: 3rd Floor | Exhibit Hall: Leonard C. Sanford Hall of North American Birds

Passenger Pigeons
Passenger Pigeon

Among the Museum's rare bird collection is a Passenger Pigeon given by Theodore Roosevelt to Frank Chapman, the Museum's first curator of birds. 

Floor: 3rd Floor | Exhibit Hall: Hall of New York City Birds

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African Wildlife

As a hunter, Theodore Roosevelt was concerned about the wanton destruction of animals in the wild. "More and more, as it becomes necessary to preserve the game," he wrote, "let us hope that the camera will largely supplant the rifle."

Floor: 2nd Floor | Exhibit Hall: Akeley Hall of African Mammals

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Roosevelt, Writer

In this room, part of New York State's official memorial to Theodore Roosevelt, aphorisms inscribed on the walls reflect his thoughts on nature, youth, manhood, and the state. A prolific writer, Roosevelt published dozens of books on natural history, American history, his outdoor adventures, and more. 

Floor: 2nd Floor | Exhibit Hall: Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda

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Milestones in Public Life

The hall's three murals depict Roosevelt's leadership in building the Panama Canal; his role in negotiating the 1905 Treaty of Portsmouth between Russia and Japan, for which he became the first American to win the Nobel Peace Prize in 1906; and his 1909-1910 expedition to Africa.

Floor: 2nd Floor | Exhibit Hall: Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda

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Theodore Roosevelt Park and Obelisk

The wooded grounds surrounding the Museum, originally known as Manhattan Square, were renamed Theodore Roosevelt Park in 1958 on the 100th anniversary of his birth. 

Floor: 1st Floor | Exhibit Hall: Theodore Roosevelt Memorial

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Hall of the Universe

Cullman Hall of the Universe

The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Hall of the Universe, located on the lower level of the Rose Center for Earth and Space, presents the discoveries of modern astrophysics. Divided into four zones, the hall covers the formation, evolution, and properties of stars, planets, galaxies, and the universe.

Food Court

Food Court

This is the food court.

Hall Cullman Hall of the Universe
Cafe Food Court
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Hall of Meteorites

Hall of Meteorites

The Arthur Ross Hall of Meteorites explores essential questions about the origins of our solar system some 4.6 billion years ago by examining meteorites, rocky fragments from space that reveal clues about the formation and evolution of the Sun and planets.

Hall of Planet Earth

Hall of Planet Earth

The David S. and Ruth L. Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth, the first part of the Rose Center to open in June 1999, displays an amazing collection of geological specimens, chosen specifically to show how our planet works.

Hall of Ocean Life

Hall of Ocean Life

The Milstein Hall of Ocean Life highlights the drama of the undersea world and its diverse and complex web of life in a fully immersive marine environment. The hall is home to one of the Museum’s most celebrated displays—a 94-foot-long, 21,000-pound model of a blue whale suspended from the ceiling.

Hall of Human Origins

Hall of Human Origins

The Anne and Bernard Spitzer Hall of Human Origins pairs fossils with DNA research to present the remarkable history of human evolution. The hall covers millions of years of human history, from early ancestors who lived more than six million years ago to modern Homo sapiens, who evolved 200,000 to 150,000 years ago.

Grand Gallery

Grand Gallery

The Museum has completed a major renovation of the historic 77th Street lobby that restores the grandeur of its original 1904 design and celebrates the preservation and revitalization of a century-old Museum icon—the 63-foot-long Great Canoe.

Grand Gallery

Hall of Minerals

The Harry Frank Guggenheim Hall of Minerals presents hundreds of striking mineral-bearing specimens collected from around the world, including a giant topaz crystal from Brazil, a 4.5-ton block of azurite-malachite ore from Arizona, and a nephrite jade slab from Poland.

Hall of New York State Environment

Hall of New York State Environment

The Felix M. Warburg Hall of New York State Environment focuses on the village of Pine Plains and Stissing Mountain in New York’s Dutchess County, an area that includes mountains, natural lakes, forests, rock formations, and both wild and cultivated land. 

Hall of Northwest Coast Indians

Hall of Northwest Coast Indians

The Hall of Northwest Coast Indians highlights the traditional cultures of the native peoples of North America’s shores from Washington State to southern Alaska, including the Kwakiutl (known today as Kwakwaka’wakw), Haida, Tlingit, and others.

Hall of North American Forests

Hall of North American Forests

The Hall of North American Forests explores the ecology and variety of the forests of North America—from a northern spruce and fir forest of Ontario to a giant cactus forest in Arizona—in addition to highlighting the forest food web and presenting techniques for protecting forests.

Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals

Hall of North American Mammals

The Hall of North American Mammals features 28 dramatic examples of the large and medium-sized mammals of the North American continent in carefully re-created habitats.

Hall of Small Mammals

Hall of Small Mammals

The Hall of Small Mammals, which is an offshoot of the larger Hall of North American Mammals, depicts a variety of animals in small dioramas of their natural habitats, from the Canadian tundra to the brush country of southern Texas.

Cosmic Pathway

Heilbrunn Cosmic Pathway

The Harriet and Robert Heilbrunn Cosmic Pathway is a 360-foot-long path in the Rose Center for Earth and Space that spirals from the exit of the Hayden Big Bang Theater to the base of the Hayden Sphere, laying out the 13-billion-year history of the universe.

Discovery Room

Discovery Room

The Discovery Room offers families, and especially children ages 5–12, an interactive gateway to the wonders of the Museum and a hands-on, behind-the-scenes look at its science.

NAM American Bison

Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals

Each diorama shows an actual place on the continent, at one moment in time, with the plants and animals you’d see there.

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Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall

The Exhibition Department is renovating, reinterpreting, and updating the first-floor Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall exhibitions for reopening in Fall 2012. 

Hall of Biodiversity

Hall of Biodiversity

The Hall of Biodiversity presents a vivid portrait of the beauty and abundance of life on Earth, highlighting both biodiversity and the factors that threaten it. Ecological biodiversity is illustrated by a 2,500-square-foot walk-through diorama that remakes part of the Dzanga-Sangha rain forest, one of Earth’s most diverse ecosystems.

Hall Hall of Meteorites
Hall Hall of Planet Earth
Hall Hall of Ocean Life
Hall Hall of Human Origins
Hall Grand Gallery
Hall Hall of Minerals
Hall Hall of New York State Environment
Hall Hall of Northwest Coast Indians
Hall Hall of North American Forests
Hall Hall of North American Mammals
Hall Hall of Small Mammals
Hall Heilbrunn Cosmic Pathway
Hall Discovery Room
Hall Bernard Family Hall of North American Mammals
Hall Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Hall
Hall Hall of Biodiversity
Hall Hall of Gems
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Hayden Big Bang Theater

Hayden Big Bang Theater

The lower half of the Hayden Sphere is home to the Hayden Big Bang Theater, where visitors can look down into a concave screen to view the Big Bang presentation, a dynamic flight through the virtual universe based on an accurate cosmic atlas mapped using millions of astronomical observations.

Hall of Mexico and Central America

Hall of Mexico and Central America

The Hall of Mexico and Central America features the diverse art, architecture, and traditions of Mesoamerican pre-Columbian cultures through artifacts that span from 1200 BC to the early 1500s.

Sanford Hall of North American Birds

Hall of Birds of the World

The Hall of Birds of the World showcases distinct environments around the world and the birds unique to those locations. Each of the hall’s 12 dioramas depicts a major biome—a region with a particular community of living things, such as a desert or tropical rainforest—along with representative species. 

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Hall of South American Peoples

The Hall of South American Peoples features the art, tools, technologies, and traditions of the continent’s pre-Columbian cultures—the ancient Inca, Moche, Chavin, and Chancay—in addition to exhibits about the traditional cultures of modern Amazonia. 

Hall of African Peoples

Hall of African Peoples

The Hall of African Peoples explores Africa's cultural heritage from ancient Egypt to more modern times. The hall highlights lifestyles and customs—many of them disappearing—of peoples living in four environments: grasslands, deserts, forests, and river regions.

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Hall of Asian Peoples

The Gardner D. Stout Hall of Asian Peoples—the Museum’s largest cultural hall—showcases some of the finest collections in Asian ethnology in the Western Hemisphere. Some 3,000 artifacts, which represent about 5 percent of the Museum’s considerable holdings, are displayed in the hall.

Akeley Hall of African Mammals

Hall of African Mammals

The Akeley Hall of African Mammals showcases large mammals of Africa. At the center is a freestanding group of eight elephants, poised as if to charge, surrounded by 28 habitat dioramas.

Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda

Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda

The Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda is New York's official memorial to the 26th President of the United States. In addition to leading expeditions for the Museum, Roosevelt championed environmental conservation.

Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda

Hall of Oceanic Birds

This hall's dioramas represent the bird life of the far-flung islands of the Pacific. These islands are geologically diverse, ranging from low coral to high mountains. One of the dioramas represents the bird population of the Guano Islands, named after the birds excretion, or guano, that coats the islands rocks.

Scales of the Universe

Scales of the Universe

Displayed along the 400-foot-long walkway that hugs the glass curtain wall on the second level of the Rose Center for Earth and Space, the Scales of the Universe vividly illustrates the vast range of sizes in the universe, from subatomic particles and objects on the human scale to the largest objects in the observable cosmos.

Cosmic Pathway

Cosmic Pathway

The Harriet and Robert Heilbrunn Cosmic Pathway is a 360-foot-long path in the Rose Center for Earth and Space that spirals from the exit of the Hayden Big Bang Theater to the base of the Hayden Sphere, laying out the 13-billion-year history of the universe.

Hayden Planetarium

Hayden Planetarium

At the heart of the Rose Center for Earth and Space is an 87-foot-diameter sphere that appears to float inside a glass cube. Its upper half constitutes the Hayden Planetarium, which opened in 2000 along with the Rose Center for Earth and Space. It remains an enduring beacon of astrophysical education, as was its predecessor, which opened in 1935.

Hall of Asian Mammals

Hall of Asian Mammals

Between 1922 and 1928, Museum Trustee Arthur S. Vernay and British Colonel John C. Faunthorpe conducted six expeditions to collect animal specimens in India, Burma (now Myanmar), and Siam (now Thailand). The specimens were then donated to the Museum and formed the foundation for the Hall of Asian Mammals, which opened in 1930.

Hall Hayden Big Bang Theater
Hall Hall of Mexico and Central America
Hall Hall of Birds of the World
Hall Hall of South American Peoples
Hall Hall of African Peoples
Hall Hall of Asian Peoples
Hall Hall of African Mammals
Hall Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda
Hall Hall of Oceanic Birds
Hall Scales of the Universe
Hall Cosmic Pathway
Hall Hayden Planetarium
Hall Hall of Asian Mammals
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Hall of Pacific Peoples

Hall of Pacific Peoples

Anthropologist and longtime Museum curator Margaret Mead provided the foundation for the hall that bears her name through her groundbreaking expeditions to Samoa, New Guinea, and Bali.

Hall of Eastern Woodland Indians

Hall of Eastern Woodlands Indians

The Hall of Eastern Woodland Indians focuses on the traditional cultures of the Native American peoples living in the Eastern Woodlands of North America, including the Iroquois, Mohegan, Ojibwa, and Cree, through the early 20th century.

Hall of Primates

Hall of Primates

The Hall of Primates explores the mammalian order that includes apes, monkeys, and humans. Primates range in size from the pygmy marmoset to the gorilla, and include species that feed on insects, fruit, leaves, and sap.

Hall of North American Birds

Hall of North American Birds

The Leonard C. Sanford Hall of North American Birds features more than 20 dioramas that depict bird species in habitats ranging from the Florida Everglades to Alaskan riverbeds, with forest, prairie, marsh, and desert among the ecosystems represented.

Hall of New York State Mammals

Hall of New York State Mammals

The Hall of New York State Mammals introduces visitors to the diversity of local wildlife. Arranged in cased displays of discrete specimens, the hall presents a range of more than 50 land mammals—from shrews to bats, beavers to bobcats—and invites comparisons of their distinctive external features, such as fur, claws, ears, body shape, and size.

Hall of New York City Birds

Hall of New York City Birds

The Hall of New York City Birds showcases the rich diversity of birds in the greater New York area. The region attracts more than 400 species of birds because of its varied habitats—which include ponds and lakes, marshes and seashore, open meadows and wooded sections—and due to its location along major bird migratory routes.

Akeley Hall of African Mammals

Hall of African Mammals

The Akeley Hall of African Mammals showcases large mammals of Africa. At the center is a freestanding group of eight elephants, poised as if to charge, surrounded by 28 habitat dioramas.

Hall of Reptiles and Amphibians

Hall of Reptiles and Amphibians

The Hall of Reptiles and Amphibians explores the anatomy, defense, locomotion, distribution, reproduction, and feeding habits of reptiles and amphibians.

Hall of Plains Indians

Hall of Plains Indians

The Hall of Plains Indians focuses on the life of 19th-century Hidatsa, Dakota (Sioux), Cheyenne, Arapaho, Crow, and other Native American peoples of the North American Plains.

Hall of Plains Indians

Hayden Planetarium

At the heart of the Rose Center for Earth and Space is an 87-foot-diameter sphere that appears to float inside a glass cube. Its upper half constitutes the Hayden Planetarium, which opened in 2000 along with the Rose Center for Earth and Space.

Hall Hall of Pacific Peoples
Hall Hall of Eastern Woodlands Indians
Hall Hall of Primates
Hall Hall of North American Birds
Hall Hall of New York State Mammals
Hall Hall of New York City Birds
Hall Hall of African Mammals
Hall Hall of Reptiles and Amphibians
Hall Hall of Plains Indians
Hall Hayden Planetarium
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Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Orientation Center

Miriam and Ida D. Wallach Orientation Center

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Orientation Center introduces visitors to the key concepts presented in the Museum’s fourth floor fossil halls.

Hall of Vertebrate Origins

Hall of Vertebrate Origins

The Hall of Vertebrate Origins traces the evolution of vertebrates, or animals with backbones, back more than 500 million years.

Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs

Saurischian Dinosaurs

One of two halls in the David H. Koch Dinosaur Wing, the Hall of Saurischian Dinosaurs features fossils from one of two major groups of dinosaurs. Saurischians are characterized by grasping hands, in which the thumb is offset from the other fingers. This hall features the imposing mounts of Tyrannosaurus rex and Apatosaurus.

Hall of Advanced Mammals

Milstein Hall of Advanced Mammals

The Paul and Irma Milstein Hall of Advanced Mammals is one of two halls in the Lila Acheson Wallace Wing of Mammals and Their Extinct Relatives, which together tell of the great diversification and sudden extinctions of this group of animals.

Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs

Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs

One of two halls in the David H. Koch Dinosaur Wing, the Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs features fossils from one of two major groups of dinosaurs.

Hall of Primitive Mammals

Hall of Primitive Mammals

The Hall of Primitive Mammals, one of two halls in the Lila Acheson Wallace Wing of Mammals and Their Extinct Relatives, traces the lower branches of the evolutionary tree of mammals, including monotremes, marsupials, sloths, and armadillos.

Hall Miriam and Ida D. Wallach Orientation Center
Hall Hall of Vertebrate Origins
Hall Saurischian Dinosaurs
Hall Milstein Hall of Advanced Mammals
Hall Hall of Ornithischian Dinosaurs
Hall Hall of Primitive Mammals

American Museum of Natural History

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Phone: 212-769-5100

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